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rv7charlie

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I guess I don't understand the authority of a DAR,....can you make one approve your build if he refuses?
I can certainly show him the rules he's supposed to follow. And if he's not willing to follow them, I can certainly tell him goodbye, and find one who understands his job. (Or better yet, get the FSDO to do their job, since I've already paid for their service.)

And to be perfectly clear, I don't have any interest in building without an ASI; I'm only talking about what is *legal*.
 

TFF

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Even though you will not be flying with a transponder or ADSB, if you are flying under the wedding cake, they can see you. Not as clear, but knowing how high you go, so they don’t come knocking on your front door is probably a good idea. Speed manual s more getting use to the plane, but because there is a greater spread of loading and stall differences. No one looks at it when touching down, but winging every bit on a strange plane might be a bit not responsible. You also have to log the various speeds in the logbook so a speed o meter is a nice quick reference.
 

blane.c

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I'm trying very hard not to sound arrogant. But under VFR we don't fly without reference to the ground and at 50-80 mph we can see stuff before we are in it. Can't you, without an altimeter as a crutch, tell within say 200' how far above ground level you are?

I know where I'm going, so I look it up before I leave. NORAD means that I'm not talking to anyone, nobody is aggining me anything. So unless "the Caretaker" sends me 70,000 light years to the "Delta Quadrant," I'm not worried. If he does, I have much bigger things like "the Phage" to worry about.
********, I have scud run with the best in the business, good hard working honest people and I can say without a doubt you have no idea of what you speak. ... Allegedly.
 

proppastie

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Yes, A-SEL, A-SES, and a thousand hours in chiefs, champs, t-cups, 'combs, but mostly in cubs
got me beat....I am dangerous in a tail dragger.....you probably do not need the airspeed indicator .......fly safe
 

99 Questions

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North East Wisconsin
Even though you will not be flying with a transponder or ADSB, if you are flying under the wedding cake, they can see you. Not as clear, but knowing how high you go, so they don’t come knocking on your front door is probably a good idea. Speed manual s more getting use to the plane, but because there is a greater spread of loading and stall differences. No one looks at it when touching down, but winging every bit on a strange plane might be a bit not responsible. You also have to log the various speeds in the logbook so a speed o meter is a nice quick reference.
The edge of the bottom of the first layer of the wedding cake is 60 miles north or 60 miles south and at 1900 feet. I'm pretty sure YOU can tell whether YOU are at 1100 feet (500 AGL) or 1900 (1400 AGL) feet. I sure can.

Air pressure under the airfoil keeps the airplane in the air. Now, I imagine it's different if you fly a Navajo or Queen Air. I'm talking about building a 425# light weight, 850# gross airplane. My experience is flying 640# to 900# light weight airplanes that grossed out at 1000# to 1400#.

At that weight you can feel how much lift you have. Ground speed is completely irrelevant, something they forgot when they made the first glass displays. Round dial ASIs read pressure but reported it as airspeed often quite inaccurately. That's why the POH has a big conversion chart in it.

The first glass panels reported the "accurate" ground speed to pilots who didn't know (or forgot) that airspeed is not what keeps them in the air. They flew slower than they would have with round gauges and stalled at higher speeds because an airplane that will stall at 44 at SL will stall at 59 at some higher altitude where there is less air pressure.

The leading local of fatal stalls is in a traffic pattern, and so many of those can be traced to the fact that pilots are taught that their airplane stalls at say "39 mph". It does, with 0* incidence, But at 45* it stalls at 71 mph. Everyone knew who threw heat and who didn't waaaay before MLB used radar guns.

You have a point about certification, but that's a procedural issue and I've just flown 'em, I've never gotten 'em certified.
 

99 Questions

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********, I have scud run with the best in the business, good hard working honest people and I can say without a doubt you have no idea of what you speak. ... Allegedly.
Darn, you caught me. I'm eleven and cranking all you guys typing this on mom's laptop while she's at the grocery. People building airplanes, how silly.

I hope she got some 'Lucky Charms."
 

Fiberglassworker

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May 28, 2021
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A FED response to minimum equipment years ago , was " Altimeter, airspeed and compass.". This was from the Atlanta EMDO in 1976. Engine instruments were nice to have but not required at that time.
 

speedracer

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********, I have scud run with the best in the business, good hard working honest people and I can say without a doubt you have no idea of what you speak. ... Allegedly.
We don't fly without reference to the ground? I've flown VFR for over two hours over solid cloud cover (over 400 miles) without seeing the ground in my LongEZ. It was raining on those poor people on the ground, clear and sunny where I was.
 

99 Questions

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We don't fly without reference to the ground?
Sorry, "I don't fly VFR without reference to the ground."

This is my hobby, my pass time, not a job. I don't ever feel "compelled." I made skis for my Cloudster (from 1930s plans adjusted for weight differential). If the weather is nice, but there is snow on the ground, I put on a snowsuit and fly. If it's warm and wet, I don't.

My original question was: "what is legally required." A couple people answered that (thank you). A couple more said something like: "well the regs don't say this but they'll probably make you do this or that," (thank you). Some people pointed out that I used incorrect terminology, (thank you).

Thank you for pointing out that I should say "I" and not "we."
 

proppastie

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Its a tough crowd mostly of FOM (F****** Old Men) who will never be 22 again.......have fun
 

proppastie

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show him the rules he's supposed to follow.
I might need that if my build goes over 254# or if I want my life-insurance to cover me in an "aircraft" rather than an "Ultra-light" ( my policy specifically excludes Ultra-Lights but not aircraft crew) . Do you have the rule number?....and yes I would be risking all my licenses to fly over weight with all the drama and being investigated at where I fly.
 

Flivverflyer

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Caldwell, ID
I need to know my temps on the Rotax 503, hence I put the CHT/EGT high on my list of critical gages. The ASI, altimeter, and RPM are just markers to check in on occasionally, while I tool along with the radio off, admiring the view. I do agree, though, that the altimeter is essential for flying at the right pattern altitude for see-and-be-seen, and for avoiding forbidden airspace.

I look at my ASI before lowering the flaps on my Flying K Sky Raider, to make sure I am below 60mph. Two more times in the pattern-- looking for 50mph on short final, and 40mph over the numbers. After that, my eyes are on the far end of the runway as I feel for ground effect and start the flare. Done right, my ASI will read down in the mid 30s on the first touch, bleeding off rapidly while I dance on the rudder pedals to a taxi speed. These speeds are targets that ensure that I am in the right ballpark for a good approach, nothing more, and for me it is reassuring. (I do remember my instructor blanking out the instrument panel on the little C150 during my training, and how much that helped wean me off the dials, though!)

BTW, TFF, how did you hear about this? So much for blacking out my shop windows.........

if you wanted to build a plane of saltine crackers powered by a bubble maker, you can. You will probably have to defend such a crazy machine, but legal.
 

rv7charlie

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I might need that if my build goes over 254# or if I want my life-insurance to cover me in an "aircraft" rather than an "Ultra-light" ( my policy specifically excludes Ultra-Lights but not aircraft crew) . Do you have the rule number?....and yes I would be risking all my licenses to fly over weight with all the drama and being investigated at where I fly.
I was afraid someone would ask that. ;-)
I was going to offer this link as a quick&dirty, but BJC's link does a better job of quoting chapter & verse. Be aware that while that article discusses 'sport pilot', the rules are for Homebuilt Experimental, whether being flown as a Sport Pilot or not.

BTW, if you want to keep your life ins coverage, just register & N-number your 253 lb air vehicle as a homebuilt experimental. There's no minimum weight for a homebuilt...
 

proppastie

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this one quotes chapter and verse of applicable regulations for instruments........but I would guess there must be written guidelines for a DAR inspection....sure 43-13 works but with a true experimental some of the "acceptable practices" of 43-13 may not be adhered to......for example the sailboat rope instead of aircraft quality steel cables....or the many automotive items such as auto seat belts etc. Grade 8 bolts instead of AN bolts......is it just up to the inspector or is there written guidance.
 
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