A Colorado Firm Claims It Can Triple the Power of Electric Engines

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Dan Thomas

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I love it when someone chastises me when I substitute "motor" for "engine" in a conversation. I tell them I am about to drive either my General Engines or Bavarian Engine Works brand vehicle down to the Department of Engine Vehicles, to make sure I am in compliance with the Engine Vehicle Code, so that I can be a happy "engine-ist" driving down the road :)
Of course. I have several outboard "motors," but only one is a motor. It's electric. The rest are engines.

English is a language cobbled together from numerous other languages, and then regional usages muddled it some more, then incorrect words became correct through common usage. Various industries appropriated words and made them mean something different. Now we have people who shortcut the spelling in their text messaging and think words should be spelled or mean whatever they want them to mean or look like.

Only in English. Flammable means the same as inflammable. Plural of mouse is mice, plural of house is houses. Plural of goose is geese, plural of moose is moose. I could go on for many pages. People of other countries, learning English, think we're crazy. No structure to the language, it seems.
 

BJC

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English is a language cobbled together from numerous other languages, and then regional usages muddled it some more, then incorrect words became correct through common usage. Various industries appropriated words and made them mean something different. Now we have people who shortcut the spelling in their text messaging and think words should be spelled or mean whatever they want them to mean or look like.
WAFM. Let’s go to Latin; a nice, precise, (and dead) language.


BJC
 

PMD

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On a more serious note Lithium is the third lightest element and as it is currently used it is just to heavy for energy storage in aircraft for any significant range, Hydrogen is the lightest element and has plenty of energy but the storage tanks ... they are so heavy as to keep the Hydrogen from immediately dispersing back into the atmosphere as to make a two place airplane the size of an Otter if you want significant range.

There has been input infinitum on this in this forum but no solutions except build small aircraft with power for about an hour of powered flight or a monster sized airplane to carry one or two people and a gargantuan amount of stored energy (other than a petroleum product) for more significant range.

Someone could possibly make a lightweight dense material that can store hydrogen without significant losses and be strong enough to handle the pressure without bursting ... they could be rich ... I think.
First of all, when it comes to the BC thing: it NOT all about the children, nor the physics, it is all about chemistry. Ever since they legalized wacky tabacky it seems to have legitimized writing legislation, regulation and policy while stoned to moon.

There IS a really simple way to store hydrogen very compactly (in fact with about 50x or more the energy density of lithium ion batteries). You combine the H2 with carbon and chose the distillate we call "kerosene" and you have a dandy and very safe way to power an airplane for very long ranges.

Now, if you just want to use the hydrogen alone, there ARE ways of storing it at extremely high density - and such a technology has been used to run engines meant to power an airplane. Originally, the effort was to use the H2 to run fuel cells on a very high altitude a/c that would loiter with a fairly light payload, but when the boffins ran the calcs the found the cooling load for the fuel cells was greater than the energy needed to simply power the plane with diesels, and the rest of the testing just went down that road. Wish I knew more about the tech, just aware of the R&D from the a/c side but reality is effective and efficient H2 storage is a LOT closer than a reasonably safe, high density and sustainable battery tech is at this time. Li Ion batteries are pretty much THE most polluting way you can power any vehicle and there is not nearly enough lithium known or expected on Earth to even put a small dent in the energy storage needed for transportation. That, and the damned things are wildly unstable when hit hard.
 

Island_flyer

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Of course. I have several outboard "motors," but only one is a motor. It's electric. The rest are engines.
.....
People of other countries, learning English, think we're crazy. No structure to the language, it seems.
Indeed. If something is fast, it could be moving rapidly or stuck firmly. To cleave can mean to stick together or cut in half. Sanction can mean to authorize something, or a measure prohibiting it. When the moon is out it's shining. When a landing light is out, it's not shining.
And, as you mentioned, some people want words or abbreviations to mean whatever they want them to. When I was a tech writer a young lady sent an email including the term "S/B". I thought she was referring to a Service Bulletin, and couldn't figure out which one until a colleague said she probably meant "should be." Oh. Back in the 1600s ailerons weren't a thing. I'm glad we have a term for the devices now. If we didn't coin new words (or modify some from other languages), we'd have to refer to all the control surfaces as rudders, because that term is centuries old. "No, not the rudder on the vertical fin, the outboard trailing edge rudders on the wings."
 

speedracer

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Of course. I have several outboard "motors," but only one is a motor. It's electric. The rest are engines.

English is a language cobbled together from numerous other languages, and then regional usages muddled it some more, then incorrect words became correct through common usage. Various industries appropriated words and made them mean something different. Now we have people who shortcut the spelling in their text messaging and think words should be spelled or mean whatever they want them to mean or look like.

Only in English. Flammable means the same as inflammable. Plural of mouse is mice, plural of house is houses. Plural of goose is geese, plural of moose is moose. I could go on for many pages. People of other countries, learning English, think we're crazy. No structure to the language, it seems.
 

Urquiola

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Aug 23, 2013
Messages
316
Location
Madrid, Spain
On a more serious note Lithium is the third lightest element and as it is currently used it is just to heavy for energy storage in aircraft for any significant range, Hydrogen is the lightest element and has plenty of energy but the storage tanks ... they are so heavy as to keep the Hydrogen from immediately dispersing back into the atmosphere as to make a two place airplane the size of an Otter if you want significant range.

There has been input infinitum on this in this forum but no solutions except build small aircraft with power for about an hour of powered flight or a monster sized airplane to carry one or two people and a gargantuan amount of stored energy (other than a petroleum product) for more significant range.

Someone could possibly make a lightweight dense material that can store hydrogen without significant losses and be strong enough to handle the pressure without bursting ... they could be rich ... I think.
There was a German company developing a Magnesium-hydrogen paste with a similar energy per Weight as Liquid fuels, but it seems Mg is in short supply, same problem blocked early development of Electric vehicles, there was not enough Lead in the World to have batteries for all.
Blessings +
 

Urquiola

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WAFM. Let’s go to Latin; a nice, precise, (and dead) language.


BJC
Latín is not so dead, same as Sánskrit, church uses it. What is sure is it is not a 'holy', language, Rome was a people of thefts, bloody tyrants; Greeks were vicious hedonists; Hebrew was the language of powerful: judges, priests, it finally displaced Aramaic, the childhood language of Jesus, spoken by common people then; besides its history, they say Aramaic is easy to learn, while Hibrit is almost Impossible. More than 50% of english terms come from Latin. Blessings +
 

Dan Thomas

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Here we bloody go again with the anti-battery misinformation.

Sigh.
Nobody is anti-battery. We all use batteries, lots of them, every day. We're against battery propaganda and marketing deceit. We older guys, especially, are tired of being lied to all our lives about what we'll be able to buy in a few years. We're still waiting for that flying car in every garage. Been promised that since the 1950s. It gets tiresome.

You'll eventually get cynical and skeptical, too.
 

Dan Thomas

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This is from Texas State Geologist Scott Tinker: The Bad Assumptions Underpinning COP26 and the Impending Energy Train Wreck

1635872202188.png

Batteries (and motors) need large percentages of current mining and smelting of some elements. So the mining and smelting of those will have to be increased enormously, and that will run into plenty of opposition, not to mention the energy required to do it and the mess it leaves behind.

And that's just to replace 20% of current car production, not trucks or airplanes or grid power storage or anything else.

Reality hurts. It always did.
 

Island_flyer

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Messages
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Latín is not so dead, same as Sánskrit, church uses it. What is sure is it is not a 'holy', language, Rome was a people of thefts, bloody tyrants; Greeks were vicious hedonists; Hebrew was the language of powerful: judges, priests, it finally displaced Aramaic, the childhood language of Jesus, spoken by common people then; besides its history, they say Aramaic is easy to learn, while Hibrit is almost Impossible. More than 50% of english terms come from Latin. Blessings +
Languages, cultures, and world history fascinate me. But at the risk of too much thread drift, I'll get back to the original topic. Back in the late 1800s and part of the early 1900s, electric cars were a little more popular in some towns because they were easier to operate. Sure they had very short range, but engines had to be started with potentially dangerous hand cranking. Some people broke an arm when the engine kicked back at just the wrong time when the operator's hand was still on the crank. A suggestion was made to use an electric motor to start the engine, but most everyone thought the motor would have to be huge, nullifying much of the potential advantage. In 1916 along came Charles Kettering who realized we need to operate the electric starter for just 20 seconds or so, thus we can run more amperage through a small motor for a short burst just to get the engine started. We've all benefited from that. In aviation we can use motors to augment lift for takeoff and landing, but but turn them off for other phases of flight. Today, Chip Irwin is experimenting with that on his Merlin Lite. The batteries can be small, and be recharged by the alternator on the engine.
 

Lendo

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Brisbane
Urquiola, got it see-https://www.electrive.com/2021/02/02/fraunhofer-develops-hydrogen-storage-paste/
Looks interesting.
George
 

PMD

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Martensville SK
In aviation we can use motors to augment lift for takeoff and landing, but but turn them off for other phases of flight. Today, Chip Irwin is experimenting with that on his Merlin Lite. The batteries can be small, and be recharged by the alternator on the engine.
Or we could just build compression ignition engines that burn Jet and diesel fuel and run them at higher power levels for takeoff for limited required time and let them have longer service life from cruising at 80%. In a lifetime of being around airplanes it seems to me we have spent a century learning how to make things better, simpler, more reliable and LIGHTER - and now we have this bad drugs or computer game -inspired trend to add tons of garbage to an aircraft to signal virtue.
 

Island_flyer

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Or we could just build compression ignition engines that burn Jet and diesel fuel and run them at higher power levels for takeoff for limited required time and let them have longer service life from cruising at 80%.
Irwin’s Merlin Lite has the motors hidden in the wing (low drag) and the props, one in each wing, operate in slots in the wings to pull air across part of the wings near the tip to augment lift for TOL. Even the smallest diesel or whatever engine wouldn’t fit there and would be far too heavy. It’s all about achieving hyper STOL while saving weight. He’s not virtue signaling anything, just experimenting with using technology to build an ultralight for an hour or so of fun flying out of small strips.
 

Bill-Higdon

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Salem, Oregon, USA
Irwin’s Merlin Lite has the motors hidden in the wing (low drag) and the props, one in each wing, operate in slots in the wings to pull air across part of the wings near the tip to augment lift for TOL. Even the smallest diesel or whatever engine wouldn’t fit there and would be far too heavy. It’s all about achieving hyper STOL while saving weight. He’s not virtue signaling anything, just experimenting with using technology to build an ultralight for an hour or so of fun flying out of small strips.
I think the Merlin Lite is is an exception to most of Electric Aviation DREK
 

PMD

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Martensville SK
Irwin’s Merlin Lite has the motors hidden in the wing (low drag) and the props, one in each wing, operate in slots in the wings to pull air across part of the wings near the tip to augment lift for TOL. Even the smallest diesel or whatever engine wouldn’t fit there and would be far too heavy. It’s all about achieving hyper STOL while saving weight. He’s not virtue signaling anything, just experimenting with using technology to build an ultralight for an hour or so of fun flying out of small strips.
Once again, a lot of monkey motion to try to make the wrong airframe do the job of another. We call them "helicopters" in some circles when we want the general public to understand how "hyperstol" has been done for decades.
 
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