A/C nail supplier

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johnski43

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Aug 2, 2021
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5
Way back I used staples to fasten ply to ribs/fuselage etc. while glue dried. I used strips (off-cuts) of 1mm (1/16) ply under the staples which eliminated any bruising and the staples were easy to remove...
 

abaham5

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Dec 14, 2020
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The most experienced builder of E- aircraft that I know uses staples with T-88. He leaves them in. If you use staples, be sure to adjust / modify the staple gun for the correct stroke and force.

Here is a photo of one of his airplanes.

View attachment 115947


BJC
Thanks for the photo and close up picture!
 

abaham5

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Dec 14, 2020
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I had a Christavia project for a while and even though the plans say the plane will weigh about 750 lbs, it seems like 950 would have been a much more accurate number. After I got mine, I did some more checking and most finished ones were 950 or more. Don't know how far along you are, but something to consider. There is one that just popped up on barnstormers yesterday for $20,000. It's in SD and was in Mn near me the last time I saw it listed for sale.
Thanks for the heads up. I am doing the build as a Father/Son project. My son is 17 years old and very interested in aviation. Making memories!
 
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Fiberglassworker

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May 28, 2021
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For wooden aircraft repair, I used to use nailing strips, these are strips of plywood, 1/8th thick by 1" wide . They would be used for wing and fuselage repairs and fabrication. I would use home depot 20ga by 1/2" long nails this gives you an effective 3/8" length, these would be tapped into the strip at 3/4" intervals with just the tips of the points showing, after the glue was spread and the part positioned, they would be tapped into place to hold the skin with a light hammer Then a few minutes later you would re tap them to increase the joint pressure because of squeeze out. When the joint was dry, they would be removed by lifting the strip, pulling the nails out of the part, have a trash can handy, because the last thing you want to do is to step onto one of these things. For rib and gusset repair I would use very small clamps and spring clothes pins no nails. As you may have guessed by now, I am a fan of pulling the nails out. I have found too many older aircraft with nail fever in the ribs where they were stored in damp conditions and the plating wore off the nails. The staple gun also works, but they are harder to get out.
 

PTAirco

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Sep 20, 2003
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3,661
Location
Corona CA
I needed nails for a Cub restoration and Aircraft Spruce now only sells nails in 7/8" lengths. Ended up having to clip every single nails to length. Nuisance. As an aside, they seem to have emptied their shelves during the Covid thing and no re-stocked anything; everything is on back order.

The fat ring nails used to prevent nails backing out on Aeroncas are still available. Seems to me they would require some pre-drilling, they are that thick.
 

blane.c

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Jun 27, 2015
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5,176
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capital district NY
Anything made from plain steel will rust forever, stain the wood and maybe the fabric. Stainless steel wire staples are easily obtainable.

Something an old wood worker showed me years ago: Don't put a sharp nail, tack or staple in wood. It will part the fibers and cause splitting. Instead, dull the point to a round shape on a grinding wheel. That will cause the wood fibers to be crushed while the fastener is driven and reduce splitting.
The point of the nail also is divided into splitters and cutters. The formed edges of the point are rounded over and are the splitters, the trimmed edges of the point are sharp (sharper) and are the cutters, you can reduce splitting by aligning the cutters perpendicular to the grain. When you blunt the point a little and place the cutters perpendicular it is about the best odds you can get.
 

speedracer

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Feb 4, 2020
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209
The point of the nail also is divided into splitters and cutters. The formed edges of the point are rounded over and are the splitters, the trimmed edges of the point are sharp (sharper) and are the cutters, you can reduce splitting by aligning the cutters perpendicular to the grain. When you blunt the point a little and place the cutters perpendicular it is about the best odds you can get.
I'm a carpenter/building contractor. When nailing the last 2x4 (or 2x6) stud at the end of a wall I have my guys put down the nail gun and hand nail it. Nailing that last stud at the end of the wall tends to split the plate. You flip the 16d nail over and whack the point with your hammer to blunt it. That has an amazing success rate of not splitting the wood.
 
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