3D printing in the Homebuilt world.

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Hot Wings

Grumpy Cynic
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Joined
Nov 14, 2009
Messages
7,585
Location
Rocky Mountains
Thanks for the offer!

The Ender 3 size is probably good enough for me. But....................

Having had the time to rethink all of this I'm leaning toward taking FritzW's advice. The last hing I need is another time suck hobby and the granddaughter is realistically another 2 years from being able to actually learn to use one.
Well, need time has arrived. My brother has both an Ender 3 and a 5 to use thanks to our local school district, but just hasn't found time to make much so...............

I bought myself an Ender 3 for Xmass and have used up the better part of a spool of PLA. Made some casting patterns for my Briggs 810 project, some slot car parts for my other brother and some kind of Mario thing for the granddaughter. Now for some purely fun stuff:

My challenge which I'm extending to the HBA world in general is what I'm calling the '220 cubed' challenge.

What?
Print a flyable model plane (glider) as a single print in the space of 220mm x 220mm.

Why?
Because I thought it would be fun and my Ender 3 will print those dimensions.

How?
I'm establishing 2 divisions. The first one is limited to using just extruded parts a couple of inches of tape and a standard coin for nose weight. The second, Open Class, allows the use of common household trash (foam meat trays for example) but the primary structure must be dependent on parts printed within the 220# perimeter. NO Balsa allowed.

My first iteration ended up WAY tail heavy and needed too much weight to be much more than a dart. Will try again in the AM - if I get any sleep tonight.

Notes on the Ender 3:
Took about 2 hours from box open to printed part using Cura. It prints far better than I would have expected based on what I read here and on the internet. Maybe my standards are low, but the mold patterns are good enough as is for lost print casting. With a little touch-up they will make very good patterns for lost wax casting.

My first ABS print curled and pulled from the bed. Need to adjust some parameters........
 

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Armilite

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2011
Messages
3,488
Location
AMES, IA USA
Well, need time has arrived. My brother has both an Ender 3 and a 5 to use thanks to our local school district, but just hasn't found time to make much so...............

I bought myself an Ender 3 for Xmass and have used up the better part of a spool of PLA. Made some casting patterns for my Briggs 810 project, some slot car parts for my other brother and some kind of Mario thing for the granddaughter. Now for some purely fun stuff:

My challenge which I'm extending to the HBA world in general is what I'm calling the '220 cubed' challenge.

What?
Print a flyable model plane (glider) as a single print in the space of 220mm x 220mm.

Why?
Because I thought it would be fun and my Ender 3 will print those dimensions.

How?
I'm establishing 2 divisions. The first one is limited to using just extruded parts a couple of inches of tape and a standard coin for nose weight. The second, Open Class, allows the use of common household trash (foam meat trays for example) but the primary structure must be dependent on parts printed within the 220# perimeter. NO Balsa allowed.

My first iteration ended up WAY tail heavy and needed too much weight to be much more than a dart. Will try again in the AM - if I get any sleep tonight.

Notes on the Ender 3:
Took about 2 hours from box open to printed part using Cura. It prints far better than I would have expected based on what I read here and on the internet. Maybe my standards are low, but the mold patterns are good enough as is for lost print casting. With a little touch-up they will make very good patterns for lost wax casting.

My first ABS print curled and pulled from the bed. Need to adjust some parameters........
======================

Instead of a Plane Model, why not a Useful Part for a Plane? Example:
3D Printed.jpg
 

kubark42

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 19, 2020
Messages
90
I use a MarkForged Mark Two for my engineering prints. It uses carbon-fiber infused nylon and then can embed any one of a half dozen continuous-strand filaments, enhancing part properties such as strength, resilience, stiffness, or temperature resistance. The proprietary print material isn't cheap as PLA, but it's much, much more versatile. With good design, when compared to manufacturing custom metal parts the results are cheaper, lighter, and stronger.

Here's my glider canopy held on by printed hinges. The parts are living hinges with kevlar reinforcing, having a breaking strength of >1300N (~300lbs) each. The two hinges shaved 100g off the plane, and allow the canopy to close better.

20200617_111857.jpg

Here's a 50g (~2oz) part carrying several hundred pounds of steel earlier this week. The first picture is the test jig, which shows the black plastic part hanging down with two empty 5 gal buckets. The second picture shows where I was after filling the buckets with scrap steel, and even starting to load with structural steel. I gave up, the part never broke and 4' girder sticking out of the pile of steel was starting to look pretty scary in the event of a fall.
20210120_135332.jpg

20210120_142507.jpg

My conclusion is that 3D printing is absolutely ready for production, but like all manufacturing it takes a certain skill set to fully utilize its advantages.

P.S. If anyone needs specialty parts designed and/or printed, DM me and we can work something out.
 
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Hot Wings

Grumpy Cynic
HBA Supporter
Log Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2009
Messages
7,585
Location
Rocky Mountains
Ran across this while looking for unrelated 3D printing info:
3d printed flange tools

This lead to other metal stamping videos using 3D printed dies. Looks like a viable option for some of our smaller parts?
 

David L. Downey

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 7, 2019
Messages
98
funny, I just printed some"widgets reverse engineered from several other makers designs in molded plastic and aluminum. Never saw the parts int eh flesh before but decided to throw the old try at them. I cannot see wy testing to destructin cannot prove conclusively wether they are safe to use. aas stated above, the material chosen and the printing parameters (and part orientation) are the entire problem to be solved for each case. I love my printer.
 
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