20 kg and 100 hp, new engine?

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hogheadv2

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Feb 7, 2010
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I think you'll find it's a sham of a steam turbine. So if you can carry a fire and boiler, your set. [Some do use a mirror solar array to boil water for the steam.]
 

RonL

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Jan 9, 2007
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Texas
No reason for this design to be a sham, unless they are unaware of what they have (not likely).

This is very near the thoughts I have tried to convey in several post. In an effort to say something in as few words as possible (which generally generates confusion:emb: in what I'm trying to express) the use of combustion is not needed or at least very little.

The model plane industry has advanced the electric motors to the point that the majority can see how powerful electric motors (and generators) can be, even when they might not understand the engineering design that allows very special performance in various situations.

As some may know, electromotive force and spring force, are conservative forces. Steam in a closed system can be equated to a spring force and a generator is an endless supply of electric energy.
A mass of some design holding heat from resistance elements will produce flash steam, the numbers they use are the same as I have used in the past. An electric motor will draw a current from the generator in exact proportion to prop load, which is added to resistance load of the steam generating unit.
A capable sized generator will continuously supply these two requirements, the motor draw is continuous while the steam portion can be steady or pulsed in cycles, depending on special needs.
Heavier than the OP design, but still likely less weight than conventional engines and their accessories and fuel system.

"Conservative forces" are the key words.....compressed air fits into the same conditions as the steam cycle, if care is used to avoid heat loss between compression and use..(also consider heat added from the steam unit will increase energy in the air).....It's there to be used, just waiting for a proper design package.

Ron
 
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sachaknoop

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Jan 30, 2012
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Netherlands
I am sorry, but I don't understand what you are saying, and I could not find out what the principle of this engine is about. So if worth the effort, could someone explain how this particular engine is supposed to work? It would be very much appreciated.

Sacha
 

RonL

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I am sorry, but I don't understand what you are saying, and I could not find out what the principle of this engine is about. So if worth the effort, could someone explain how this particular engine is supposed to work? It would be very much appreciated.

Sacha
I guess this is in response to my post,
First, I am not an engineer by degree or profession. what I know is based on things used, things seen, and things studied.
That said, I would know it is beyond my ability to make a proper design or prototype. Everything is based on reduction in size of what works in larger scale systems. Complete control of what is heated and how that heat is confined and used in the system, is where energy can be conserved to a much greater efficiency as work transfers take place.

The intent or principle of what I said, is using a generator beyond what most.. (or all)...think possible. A replacement of (not all) but the largest amount of a battery pack.

The link in the OP is, in my understanding, a fuel powered small scale power plant using a closed steam cycle. I see no reason that it will fall short of their claims.

Sorry if this is not much of an answer to your post, but I really do go dysfunctional when trying to explain intricate details.:)

Ron
 
M

Manticore

I saw one of these many years ago in a factory that was pre-processing milk fats for chocolate making - it didn't have the big fan but otherwise identical ;^}
 

batesjoe

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Mar 21, 2013
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Alamogordo
These engines present an interesting concept. They are a little "busy" on the gearing end, but not to the point of nonsense. Unfortunately, an engine like this is difficult to scale to different power thresholds being a single cylinder design. You would have quite a heavy gearbox of you wanted to make a 4-cylinder engine and, alternatively, a pretty large piston to do a similar displacement single. Not bad though. It would make for a clean cowling arrangement for someone looking in the 40-60hp range.
 

Lendo

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Feb 6, 2013
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Brisbane
I've seen some of these designs before, all very interesting. There are 3 main criteria for any new engine development one is the sealing issue of unusual designs, which is always an issue, and naurally efficiency and longevity for any engine, Retooling or tooling-up is the next manufacturing hurdle and without a 30% efficiency dividend - not much interest by manufacturers.
George (down under)
 

Aircar

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Feb 20, 2010
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on the same line has anyone seen any real data on the MYT ("Mighty Yet Tiny") engine that claims incredible power density - I came across a reference to a supposed Australian Defence Force evaluation by a colonel? "Laboo" --have yet to try to follow up on it. An earlier thread covered free piston electric generators and that one seemed to have disappeared.
 
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