10/23 Raptor Video

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Vigilant1

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Yeah, but now when you make the new molds, the final product will have corn cob shaped depressions in it… kind of like dimpling a golf ball, but on a much larger scale.
If it landed in a Midwest cornfield in early August and doesn't have substantial damage, we'll have yet another indication of just how "robust" the layup schedule must have been.
 

231TC

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Gear up probably would have been a better choice, but maybe he was going for the road.
 

Pops

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That is what I was thinking, going for the road. Hate to see that.
 

Turd Ferguson

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corn cobs got the better of that prop.
Gear up probably would have been a better choice, but maybe he was going for the road.
He may have touched down on a road and had challenging directional control or overrun.
I could not imagine the noise going into that corn at 100 mph !
 

Toobuilder

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You all knew it was "When", not "If", and yet you all suddenly go soft.

The guy is a danger to himself, others on the ground, and the homebuilder/kit industry.

I don't want to see him dead, or seriously hurt, none of us do, but he is putting others, who were lucky this time, in danger, and I have zero sympathy for him.

Re: An old Australian saying: "I hope he banged his head and knocked some sense into it".
You are right on all counts. This outcome (though later than most of us thought), was inevitable. The sands of luck were running out of his hourglass faster than the Raptor could eat miles to the final destination. At least nobody was injured, so this event is not likely to make national news as some kind of sensationalized "milestone" safety expose'. It will hopefully fade away quietly from the public eye and remain to homebuilders as nothing more than yet another example of how NOT to accomplish an aircraft development program.
 

C Michael Hoover

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I, for one, am happy at the outcome. Peter walked away, and the plane will Not be flying again without a major rebuild. So no one can get hurt or worse. And the major rebuild time can, and I hope, mean correcting the multitude of mistakes in the original.
 

Rataplan

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Low altitude and the chute is untested. The chance of the chute failing and falling to the ground in a stalled condition would be very high. I'd rather glide it in and be in control until impact.
me to but would hv been the ultimate test
 

231TC

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Great news from Peter: "We're actually going transport it directly to Boise where we have what we need."

It's the obvious way to go, but I wasn't confident he wouldn't try to patch it together at the nearest airport and again try to fly it to Idaho.
 

BBerson

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A corn stalk hanging from the top of the right vertical fin. And right skid might be split. Looks like canard is folded back with leading edge showing?
 

flywheel1935

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When it comes to generating sales, (of an aircraft kit that really has little purpose) this episode is up there with the Evel Knievel Canyon jump, or maiden voyage of the Titanic. They are all only remembered as outright failures.
( If I was to invest in a company I would even consider looking at Summer Rubber Shoes for one legged customers, but that may well just be a FLOP !!!! once
had the chance to buy a Puppet Company many years ago, but that had 'strings attached' )
 

wsimpso1

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The Thielert/Continental CD155 was EASA certificated up to 25K. Intercooling was not that tricky and a single turbo only used.

View attachment 113981
ok, let‘s look at this in a little detail. See where the vertical lines bend over at a slant? That is where the wastegate is closed and the turbo is running flat out, but has No excess boost for pressurization. Above that altitude, no pressurization. So at 100% rpm, you lose all ability to pressurize at 7000 feet. At 65% rpm, pressurization is gone at 19000 feet. so, running high power to climb won’t happen because you won’t have any air for the cabin.

Then comes the issue of will there be enough air to hold pressure? That comes right down to how leaky is the Cabin? We do not know that answer, but generally, you turn over a lot of air. Let’s just guess at one full change of cabin air every two minutes. I just did a simple estimate of cabin volume at 140 cubic feet (5 feet * 4 feet * pi/4 * 8 feet) so you might need 70 cubic feet of air a minute for the cabin. How much air is the engine using? The engine uses about 540 cubic feet per minute (3.5l * 61in/l * 3500/ min / 2 * 2.5 pressure atmosperic/1728 in^3\ft^3). You need, for this example, at least 13% excess air just to maintain pressurization. To compute actual needs, you would have to survey the entire operating envelope and select compressors accordingly.

To make this engine pressurize the cabin to 25000 feet, you need excess turbo for climb power to be above 25000 feet. A bigger turbo is unlikely to achieve that as pressure ratios would have to be bigger than what is available. Staging with intercooler and aftercooler can do it. Lots more cooling air, well handled, is needed, plus coolers for the cabin pressurization air.

Look at the various turbo-diesels on airplanes, and even without pressurization and with low critical altitude, their cowlings are huge and dominated by coolers. Now imagine more turbo, more coolers, and trying to fit all that inside the volume available…

Anything like achieving this thing‘s altitude goals is way beyond any other turbo-diesel flying. Just one of several stretch objectives that was glibly treated like it would be easy…

Billski
 

wsimpso1

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View attachment 113984

From Nebraska State Patrol's Facebook page
Ok, roll To the left with right main down means left main gear is either collapsed or wiped out;
Nose gear pieces in the foreground means nose gear wiped out;
Prop blades missing means the prop is toast;
Dirty effluent from cowling means something bled to death, PSRU or engine or both got wiped out;
Maybe the wings, canard, and fuselage are OK, maybe not.

I can see the new owners using this airplane as a plug to modify the molds and such. ugh.
 
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