1/3rd scale Cessna 152 rc

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radfordc

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If built as light as a balsa model (same light wing loading typical in RC models), then is your aluminum as strong and stiff as balsa?
Models are usually built lighter/stronger when compared to full size planes. So the structure would not necessarily need to be as robust as for a full size. I have a large scale Beaver (110" span) that uses a 1/2" 6061 tube a the main spar and with functional wing struts is more than strong enough.
 

Himat

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May 5, 2011
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Norway
I was looking into thin strong aluminium, a source may be the plates that used to be used to print newspapers might be a source?
Probably yes.
Over the years I have read about and seen a few large-scale model airplanes where lito plate, the aluminium sheet used in printing have been used as building material. I do not know if the spars where some extrusion or thicker plate. The writers do usually not go that into the details.
 

bmcj

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Models are usually built lighter/stronger when compared to full size planes. So the structure would not necessarily need to be as robust as for a full size. I have a large scale Beaver (110" span) that uses a 1/2" 6061 tube a the main spar and with functional wing struts is more than strong enough.
Very true, but I was making the point that if you can match the weight and still be as strong and stiff as valse, then you know you are good to go.

One thing that has not been mentioned here so far but warrants consideration is the fatigue limits of aluminum.
 
Joined
Aug 11, 2008
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The illustrated parts catalog will be your best reference, however a letter to Cessna may yield some results. Explain to them qhat you are trying to do. Somtimes you'll luck out and get to correspond with an old timer. Address it to product support, C150-152. The worst thing that can happen is they blow you off. I owned a C-150 for 20 years and they helped me with brochures depicting factory paint schemes and interiors. As I see it the most challenging areas will be the lower cowling and the belly skin just aft of the gear box. These were hammer formed skins with a compound curve. The landing gear will also be a challenge. The main leg is a steel tapered rod with a complex fairing surrounding it . The rest of the plane is flat sheets of AL formed into pretty simple parts. All the beautiful metal wing and srab tips of the early C-150's wefe eventually replaced with thermoformed plastic so that should help. Check out K&S metals. Some of their extrusions might help. If you can find a aircraft dismantler close by, you'll probay find a 150 or two. There are 150-152 orgs on the web, contact them as well.
Gerry
 

Aviation geek

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Jun 10, 2019
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The illustrated parts catalog will be your best reference, however a letter to Cessna may yield some results. Explain to them qhat you are trying to do. Somtimes you'll luck out and get to correspond with an old timer. Address it to product support, C150-152. The worst thing that can happen is they blow you off. I owned a C-150 for 20 years and they helped me with brochures depicting factory paint schemes and interiors. As I see it the most challenging areas will be the lower cowling and the belly skin just aft of the gear box. These were hammer formed skins with a compound curve. The landing gear will also be a challenge. The main leg is a steel tapered rod with a complex fairing surrounding it . The rest of the plane is flat sheets of AL formed into pretty simple parts. All the beautiful metal wing and srab tips of the early C-150's wefe eventually replaced with thermoformed plastic so that should help. Check out K&S metals. Some of their extrusions might help. If you can find a aircraft dismantler close by, you'll probay find a 150 or two. There are 150-152 orgs on the web, contact them as well.
Gerry
Hi Gerry
Yes I’ll contact Cessna you never know what luck I’ll get I fly from cessnas anyway so I have access to all external parts for reference photos which I’ve got I’m sure there’s a Cessna 150 fuselage in the hangar gathering dust I wreckon if I asked one of the chaps they would let me takes photos and measurements it has the wings removed where they are I don’t know but I have a lot of the info for them already the rest I’ll just make up
Your right about the cowl and front end that’s going to be tricky it will be a challenge to hammer form that worse case is I have to used glass fibre from a mould I guess
I’ve sourced some 5052 aluminium 20% stronger than what I’m using now so hopefully that will be strong enough for the spars and ribs
Someone mentioned beer can alu which might be strong enough for the skin ? But I’d have to source somewhere which sells it off the roll kind of thing
I’d love to make the 2 fuel tanks as well now that would be awesome if I could make the shape from planishing
 

BJC

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Oct 7, 2013
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I never thought that I would own an A152, but I did and had lots of fun with it, including giving rides to many, many people.

Replicating all parts of a C152 will be a PITA. Instead, design a new internal structure using the sizes of materials readily available, keeping all external dimensions to scale. Going through the basic calculations will be educational, and, if you are one of us (HBAers), fun.


BJC
 
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