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BJC

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Oct 7, 2013
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12,319
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97FL, Florida, USA
It always looked to me like it would still fly without the wings!
I saw it go from level knife edge flight to sustained climbing in knife edge at a very steep angle. Afterwards, I commented to Delmar that the only reason that it needed wings was to have a place to mount the ailerons. Amazing airplane. Note that Delmar has more Gee Bee time than all the other Gee Bee pilots combined.


BJC
 

plncraze

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May 11, 2006
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1,954
On its first flight they took a lot of pictures...just in case.
 

Tiger Tim

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Apr 26, 2013
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Thunder Bay
From most of what I’ve read Gee Bee racers didn’t really deserve their bad reputation, or at least the Granville brothers didn’t. IIRC none were lost while supported by the Granvilles.

I think it would be neat to build and fly a replica Gee Bee, but one of the more sedate ones. A D-model or E-model would be a nice little runabout.
 

Tiger Tim

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Apr 26, 2013
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A Gee Bee Model F (the Model X renamed when they switched to a Fairchild engine) would be a fun way to go after those $100 hamburgers:
 

TFF

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Apr 28, 2010
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13,977
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Memphis, TN
I am waiting for that new one too. What is interesting is the "small" GeeBees and the "racers" have the same general wingspan and area. It's not perceived that way though. I think a D or Y would be a worthy project. I have tried to get some drawings but hit dead ends. Still on the lookout. I would cheat and put a 23012 airfoil on it though.
 

MadRocketScientist

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May 16, 2009
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1,668
Location
Canterbury, New Zealand, Earth, Milky Way Galaxy.
From most of what I’ve read Gee Bee racers didn’t really deserve their bad reputation, or at least the Granville brothers didn’t. IIRC none were lost while supported by the Granvilles.

I think it would be neat to build and fly a replica Gee Bee, but one of the more sedate ones. A D-model or E-model would be a nice little runabout.
From what I hear they handle pretty well but have to be flown like a high performance airplane rather than your average Cessna. We still occasionally hear of the same thing killing pilots today who try and fly a pocket rocket like its a piper cub.
 

plncraze

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May 11, 2006
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1,954
Many years ago Air Proogress IIRC spoke with Doolittle and Haizlip about the Gee Bee racers. Doolittle thought it far more challenging to fly than Haizlip did.
When Bill Turner had his wreck in the Z replica one of the surviving Granvilles asked him not to fly it anymore because he had proven it could fly well.
The museum out east which holds original Gee Bee plans was made to promise no flying aircraft would be built from them.
These planes have a complicated history made more difficult by the passage of time. That's too bad because the two seat production planes would be cool homebuilts.
 

JIC

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Dec 31, 2010
Messages
290
Location
Middleton, Idaho
The story is the Smithsonian Institution gave them permission to take pictures and measurements of the original one so they could built the replica.
 

TFF

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Apr 28, 2010
Messages
13,977
Location
Memphis, TN
There are only two real GeeBees I know of, the biplane and the QED in Mexico. There are pieces of the real planes around but nothing big. There is a wing of, I think, a D at the Oshkosh museum. The plans are owned by the family and they protect them; but they have a love hate relationship with the legacy. They have allowed museums to build non flying replicase from them, but not flying planes. I believe Delmar Benjamin was allowed to peruse the plans but not copy them. Mostly after he had started the build. The one that is about finished is using some of Benjamin's spares, and the guy put in his due diligence finding out how to build it; something like 10 years of gathering info to build. The Z that Kevin Kimball built has a similar story. Lots of legwork and friends and favors to get access to the nitty gritty.
 
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