Page 8 of 10 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 LastLast
Results 106 to 120 of 139

Thread: Replica home builts

  1. #106
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    1,049
    Likes (Given)
    7
    Likes (Received)
    287

    Re: Replica home builts

    Fokker used thick airfoils to hide the deep, wooden box spars in his wings. Fokker was a pioneering builder of cantilever wings. Many of Fokker’s fighters had cantilever wings and outboard interplane struts were installed to pacify generals who preferred wire-braced wings.

  2. #107
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    1,049
    Likes (Given)
    7
    Likes (Received)
    287

    Re: Replica home builts

    I thought about building a replica of my ex-wife but eventually decided that a battle axe would clash with the rest of the decor in my apartment.

  3. Likes cluttonfred, Battler Britton liked this post
  4. #108
    Registered User Tiger Tim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Thunder Bay
    Posts
    2,589
    Likes (Given)
    1381
    Likes (Received)
    1451

    Re: Replica home builts

    Quote Originally Posted by Little Scrapper View Post
    Can't help but wonder what it would be like to fly a minimalist spartan light weight Pitts.
    Attachment 79138
    Bud Davisson makes it sound just lovely.
    http://airbum.com/Pitts/PirepPittsReplica.html
    I think the original was built out of major chunks of a Taylorcraft L-2. If so, the firewall is probably about where the '2' is and you'd sit right around the first white stripe.

  5. #109
    Registered User Victor Bravo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    KWHP, Los Angeles CA, USA
    Posts
    5,404
    Likes (Given)
    1095
    Likes (Received)
    4401

    Re: Replica home builts

    The actual real-world hard-ass reality is a one-two punch that has knocked down a lot of dreams :

    1) smaller size replicas usually do not fly as well as the full size airplanes they were derived from, and
    2) the original full size airplanes that inspired us as kids or beckon us from the history books as adults very often did not fly very well to start with.

    I have an acquaintance who is a very high-end test pilot and F-4 combat vetreran, a real live Edwards AFB guy with all the bells and whistles. I'm not physically strong enough to lift his resume'. Someone asked him what airplane was the biggest disappointment in his career, and without hesitation he said "the P-51".

    You can't say all replica aircraft don't fly well, I'm sure there are some that do just fine. I spoke to a guy who has one of the "Criquet" brand replicas of the Fieseler Storch (Rotax 912), and he says it flies well, does almost everything the original did, but fits in a normal size hangar.

    But IMHO before anyone should plunk down money or time on anything like this they owe it to themselves (and their family) to do their due diligence and get one or more expert opinions on what they are going to actually wind up with.
    "Everything in this book may be wrong."
    Richard Bach, Illusions

    "Common sense is so rare today, it should be reclassified as a superpower!"
    Derswede


  6. Likes pictsidhe, Turd Ferguson liked this post
  7. #110
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    USA.
    Posts
    6,427
    Likes (Given)
    3259
    Likes (Received)
    5339

    Re: Replica home builts

    Quote Originally Posted by Victor Bravo View Post
    The actual real-world hard-ass reality is a one-two punch that has knocked down a lot of dreams :

    1) smaller size replicas usually do not fly as well as the full size airplanes they were derived from, and
    2) the original full size airplanes that inspired us as kids or beckon us from the history books as adults very often did not fly very well to start with.

    I have an acquaintance who is a very high-end test pilot and F-4 combat vetreran, a real live Edwards AFB guy with all the bells and whistles. I'm not physically strong enough to lift his resume'. Someone asked him what airplane was the biggest disappointment in his career, and without hesitation he said "the P-51".

    You can't say all replica aircraft don't fly well, I'm sure there are some that do just fine. I spoke to a guy who has one of the "Criquet" brand replicas of the Fieseler Storch (Rotax 912), and he says it flies well, does almost everything the original did, but fits in a normal size hangar.

    But IMHO before anyone should plunk down money or time on anything like this they owe it to themselves (and their family) to do their due diligence and get one or more expert opinions on what they are going to actually wind up with.
    There are several homebuilts that in MHO do not fly well.
    Pops

    If its not there, it cost nothing, weighs nothing, and is 100% reliable.

  8. #111
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    1,049
    Likes (Given)
    7
    Likes (Received)
    287

    Re: Replica home builts

    Quote Originally Posted by radfordc View Post
    The DH-2 is sitting in Robert's shop. I think it hasn't been flown since Harvey test flew it and recommended it not be flown again. I think something about top speed and stall speed being too close together.
    .................................................. .........
    Sounds like it flew just like the original DH-2!

    Many WW1 airplanes stalled at higher than normal speeds often close to their cruising speed. They only had tail skies and no brakes which meant that they needed assistance to make right turns on the ground. Just another task for mechanics who struggled to keep them airworthy! Even at the best of times, engines were less than reliable.
    Many had tiny rudders. Finally, they were tail-heavy so required constant control inputs to fly straight and level. That aft centre of gravity allowed them to fly faster but some were balanced so far aft that they could not recover from stalls or spins. As many young pilots died in lonely crashes as were shot down.
    Last edited by Riggerrob; March 15th, 2019 at 12:32 PM. Reason: delete a word

  9. #112
    Registered User larr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    markham, ontario, canada
    Posts
    154
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    43

    Re: Replica home builts

    Quote Originally Posted by Riggerrob View Post
    Fokker used thick airfoils to hide the deep, wooden box spars in his wings. Fokker was a pioneering builder of cantilever wings. Many of Fokker’s fighters had cantilever wings and outboard interplane struts were installed to pacify generals who preferred wire-braced wings.
    No.
    Boring History Moment
    Hugo Junkers used his windtunnel to determine that a thick section wing did not have a significantly different drag profile to a thin section wing, a fundamental fact in the development of a cantilever wing. During WWI Idflieg was unhappy with Junkers ability to produce the new cantilever aircraft and forced Junkers and Fokker to work together. Essentially, Fokker stole Junkers technology leading to law suits thet outlived them both.
    Fokker was not hiding anything in the thick wing. It was necessary to have a spar that was strong enough.

    Less OT, only replicas of aircraft up to the 1920's can be reproduced accurately. After that they are too heavy and sub scale replicas are never accurate.
    I don't think there is anything out there that is going to meet any kind of exacting requirement.
    Aviation is always about compromise.

  10. #113
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    1,049
    Likes (Given)
    7
    Likes (Received)
    287

    Re: Replica home builts

    Hmmmm?
    Fokker installed wooden box spars while Junkers built space frames from aluminum tubing.

  11. #114
    Registered User cluttonfred's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    World traveler
    Posts
    6,210
    Likes (Given)
    1925
    Likes (Received)
    2153

    Re: Replica home builts

    Oooh, if we’re going for the separate pilot cockpit and passenger cabin types then I vote for a DH.83 Fox Moth. Full size is not too huge and even at 7/8 scale it could be a three seater. It just has so much raw style. The wings even fold!

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	6D872AD3-78F3-4C65-9B45-CBAE2A596805.jpg 
Views:	3 
Size:	66.9 KB 
ID:	79148 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	6D876CAE-96F1-4BFB-B2AA-E3B0B95AD33E.png 
Views:	3 
Size:	247.7 KB 
ID:	79149 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	BA10E85A-D20B-4B14-9F4A-696D252D4E33.png 
Views:	3 
Size:	488.0 KB 
ID:	79150
    *******
    Matthew Long, Editor
    cluttonfred.info
    A site for builders, owners and fans of Eric Clutton's FRED and other safe, simple, affordable homebuilt aircraft

    « Voici ce que j'ai fait...vous pouvez en faire autant! »
    "This is what I have done...you can do the same!"
    --Henri Mignet (1893-1965)

  12. Likes MadRocketScientist, TarDevil liked this post
  13. #115
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    1,049
    Likes (Given)
    7
    Likes (Received)
    287

    Re: Replica home builts

    After WW2, deHavilland of Canada converted war-surplus Tiger Moths to 4-seater Fox Moths.
    Meanwhile Thruston (Australia) converted 17 Tiger Moths to 4-Seater Jackaroos with double-wide Perspex canopies. They advertised it as the “cheapest four-seater airplane!’
    Rollason converted the 18th Jackaroo.

    Considering how many different Tiger Moth replica plans are available, you would only need to widen the fuselage. Mind you, I doubt if a sub-scale replica could carry 4 or 5 people. Three people is more realistic.
    Last edited by Riggerrob; March 15th, 2019 at 11:09 PM. Reason: Correct a number

  14. Likes cluttonfred, Tiger Tim liked this post
  15. #116
    Moderator Dana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    8,561
    Likes (Given)
    452
    Likes (Received)
    2847

    Re: Replica home builts

    For a really obscure WWI plane, perhaps a Macchi M.5 flying boat...




    Or perhaps a Packard-LePere LUSAC II, a US built fighter that was too late to see service:

    Hatz CB-1 Biplane
    Starduster SA-100 rebuild project for sale
    Fisher FP-404 (sold)
    ParaFan PPG (dormant project)
    Kolb Ultrastar (sold)

  16. #117
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Rochester, NY, USA
    Posts
    2,193
    Likes (Given)
    33
    Likes (Received)
    855

    Re: Replica home builts

    Re: Fokker vs. Junkers.

    Fokker's greatest strength was frankly the ability to steal & have his crew improve. He was a great salesman, good pilot, and had a decent sense as to what flies well.

    Junkers developed the thick airfoil. Fokker had a "legal" partnership with Junkers, arranged by the High Command.... And yeah, the lawsuits outlasted the principals.

    Fokker's first cantilever "theft" was having designed wood wings for the famed Triplane. No wires , and the prototype didn't even have outboard interplane struts, as Riggerrob points out. They were added because the pilots were frightened by the wings ( safely ) flexing.

    Yes, it was a concept "stolen" from Junkers. What really annoyed Junkers was that Fokker wasn't making Junkers airplanes, instead he was translating the thick wing shapes in wood, instead of using metal, to make copies that Junkers wanted Fokker to pay royalties on.....

    Fokker did several prototypes with cantilever wings before the D.VII. None were purchased in large quantities. The D.VI https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fokker_D.VI saw some use.

    What is seldom mentioned is that Fokker, being Dutch, wasn't given priority to get the more powerful Mercedes-Benz and BMW inline 6 cylinder engines. Instead he was limited to the German copy of the French rotaries, for most of the war. That's often a hundred horsepower deficit.

  17. #118
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Rochester, NY, USA
    Posts
    2,193
    Likes (Given)
    33
    Likes (Received)
    855

    Re: Replica home builts

    Re: bad flying machines.

    https://www.amazon.com/Corky-Meyers-.../dp/1580072038

    Although WW2 era, this is an excellent book, not on being a test pilot ( although the advice there is priceless ) but on comparing the different planes, from the perspective of a Grumman pro test pilot. With a great sense of humor.

    Several iconic planes do not get high praise. Deathtrap isn't too strong a word, considering training fatalities in the Air Corps.

    One item not commonly discussed in the magazines is the P-47 handbook was very clear, that you should not do a split S under 15,000 feet AGL. The Thunderbolt picked up so much speed in the dive you could not pull out before impact from lower than about 3 miles.

    Consider that when we argue techniques for the "impossible turn".


    Also consider that nearly as many died in training in a Sopwith Camel as were shot down. The Sopwith Pup, otoh, was a much easier plane to fly.

    How about these, for inspiration?
    http://www.air-racing-history.com/ai...-4%20DGA-5.htm

  18. #119
    Registered User blane.c's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    capital district NY
    Posts
    2,360
    Likes (Given)
    717
    Likes (Received)
    422

    Re: Replica home builts

    Those "Rotary Engines" were total loss oil, castor oil. Everything behind the propeller blast was coated in oil, I wonder if it had anything to do the development of tracer bullets.

  19. #120
    Registered User radfordc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    1,008
    Likes (Given)
    19
    Likes (Received)
    371

    Re: Replica home builts

    Quote Originally Posted by Aesquire View Post

    One item not commonly discussed in the magazines is the P-47 handbook was very clear, that you should not do a split S under 15,000 feet AGL. The Thunderbolt picked up so much speed in the dive you could not pull out before impact from lower than about 3 miles. ]
    So, you're saying that a P-47 doing a loop has to top out at 15000 ft in order to recover. Now where did I put that BS flag?

Similar Threads

  1. Electric Home Builts? China Is About to Bury Elon Musk in Batteries
    By rbrochey in forum Firewall Forward / Props / Fuel system
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: June 29th, 2017, 01:42 PM
  2. New to HBA but not to home building
    By Billrsv4 in forum New Member Introductions
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: October 1st, 2016, 12:49 AM
  3. GA A&P's and home builts
    By Tony in forum Hangar Flying
    Replies: 44
    Last Post: August 9th, 2012, 09:45 PM
  4. Monofly needs home.
    By chip114 in forum For Sale / Wanted
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: April 29th, 2008, 10:10 AM
  5. First Home Built
    By Dave S in forum General Experimental Aviation Questions
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: November 30th, 2006, 01:22 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •