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  1. Angusnofangus

    Solid Rivet shop head size criteria

    Not every rivet needs to be textbook perfect, but one should strive for that. That said, the odd rivet that doesn't meet specs is not going to make the airplane fall out of the sky.
  2. Angusnofangus

    Cessna tests new “Skycourier” and it’s actually not too terrible

    Looks to be a bit boxier that Twin Otter. In order to accommodate containers I'm sure. Same number of passengers in that configuration, 19. 19 in a Twin Otter is cramped, probably better in the Cessna.
  3. Angusnofangus

    Cessna tests new “Skycourier” and it’s actually not too terrible

    In the late 90's I worked for a cargo carrier that used Shorts 330's and 360's. Was installing systems by which they could carry containers. I think they ultimately worked out well.
  4. Angusnofangus

    Solid Rivet shop head size criteria

    Just had a look at the referenced Mil Spec, and it tells you just about everything you need to know about riveting.
  5. Angusnofangus

    Solid Rivet shop head size criteria

    Agree that 1.3 d will give you an acceptable shop head, although 1.5 is ideal. Sometime because of the stack-up you would have to use the shorter length, but still maintain at least 1.3. The longer you get from 1.5, the harder they are to take down without dumping. I've bucked hundreds of...
  6. Angusnofangus

    Solid Rivet shop head size criteria

    I don't agree that smaller tails on large rivets are OK. There are standards for tail sizes for a reason. I think it is safe to say that every aircraft manufacturer defines acceptable shop head sizes for every solid rivet, and that they are all within a few thousandths of an inch of each other.
  7. Angusnofangus

    Solid Rivet shop head size criteria

    Rivets ARE shear fasteners. Bolts, Hi-Locs, etc, can be tension fasteners, also can be use in shear.
  8. Angusnofangus

    Solid Rivet shop head size criteria

    That makes sense, as driving AD's in 1100 or 3003 will give you big divots around each rivet head. I'm sure you won't find either alloy used structurally in any certificated airplane. No designer worth his salt would use those alloys as structure in a homebuilt either.
  9. Angusnofangus

    Solid Rivet shop head size criteria

    No way can you get an acceptable shop head with 1d protrusion (unless you are driving Monel rivets, and 1d is standard for them).
  10. Angusnofangus

    Solid Rivet shop head size criteria

    'A' rivets do have some use on certificated aircraft, mainly in thin fairings, but never in anything structural. It would make no sense to use a larger (3/16) A rivet if a 1/8 AD is the same strength.
  11. Angusnofangus

    Solid Rivet shop head size criteria

    The general standard for aluminum rivets is 1 1/2d protruding through the material stack-up. You could get an acceptable shop head size with 1 1/4d but not with 1d.
  12. Angusnofangus

    Solid Rivet shop head size criteria

    Those 1100 rivets are 'A' rivets, 2117's are 'AD' s, 'A' rivets are very soft and never used structurally. RV7 Charlie's example of someone substituting rivets for bolts is a huge no-no. You can NEVER substitute a weaker fastener for a stronger one. That said, Cherry-Max can be used in place of...
  13. Angusnofangus

    Solid Rivet shop head size criteria

    I think some people might think that it's too steep of a learning curve to use solid rivets, but I don't feel that it is really that bad. I had my grandson driving rivets when he was six, and after the first few, he got right into it. Noise could certainly be a factor, especially if one is...
  14. Angusnofangus

    Cessna tests new “Skycourier” and it’s actually not too terrible

    I most certainly is!! It is being produced by Viking Air in North Saanich, BC. I retired out of there a couple of years ago. Viking also holds the type certificates for all of the deHavilland Canada aircraft, including the Q400.
  15. Angusnofangus

    Solid Rivet shop head size criteria

    Air hammers are not the same as rivet guns, you don't have the control that the teasing trigger of a proper rivet gun has. I have a spare 3X gun that I would let you have cheap. PM me if interested.
  16. Angusnofangus

    Solid Rivet shop head size criteria

    Good advice. I've worked with guys who would use a 4X gun to shoot 1/8's, the logic being that you hit the rivet harder for less time.
  17. Angusnofangus

    Solid Rivet shop head size criteria

    I don't feel that it makes any difference, helper or not. As long as I could reach it, I could usually shoot and buck. But then I did it for 28 years and probably a couple of million rivets.
  18. Angusnofangus

    Solid Rivet shop head size criteria

    IMHO the best all-around rivet gun is a 3X. Sometimes space might call for a 2X, but I always disliked using one except for when nothing else would fit the space, and then they are only good for 1/8 rivets. At one place I worked we had a 2X sized Copco that would easily drive 5/32's. Only thing...
  19. Angusnofangus

    Solid Rivet shop head size criteria

    I don't feel that work-hardening is a problem with smaller rivets, as they are pretty easy to take down. !/4 inch rivets, yes, and 3/16, maybe. But 5/32 and smaller, not in my experience.
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