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Thread: WW1 wooden biplane

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    WW1 wooden biplane

    I am intrested in building a wooden WW1 biplane, any ideas of which on to build or not to build would be appriciated.

    Jim

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    Registered User Tomt's Avatar
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    Re: WW1 wooden biplane

    Hm, I think the most WW1 planes were mixed Contructions.
    Can you weld? I think the most have a welded steelframe.
    Which planes you like the most? The fokker Triplane or Sopwith Camel?

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    Re: WW1 wooden biplane

    D7 seems the most modern, but the engine is the hard part finding something that will work. Dr1 is modern and engines are easer to substitute. Both Fokkers are wood wings and steel fuse similar to modern bipes. The Camel would be the hardest to make because of all the brackets, it is my favorite though. Replicraft has blueprints for some; I have the Camel ones. I also have some modernized Nieuport 28 blueprints. Replica Aircraft has a section on building replicas

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    Registered User wiloows5050's Avatar
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    Re: WW1 wooden biplane

    If you go for the all wood, don't expect it to progress quickly unless you have plans that have been updated for modern construction techniques. I started a Thomas Morse using Replicraft plans. I figure my son will have to finish it. I think you'll be able to get the most support if you go Sopwith, there seem to be more of the metal fitting available though differnet sources. Several Sopwiths (Strutter, Pup, Camel) have been adapted with welded steel fuselages which probably saved years on construction time.

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    Re: WW1 wooden biplane

    Yes I can weld and I have a Mig welder, but I thought the wood would be easier.

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    Re: WW1 wooden biplane

    Jim, have you looked at www.airdromeairplanes.com ? They are not wood but are less time consuming than most wood projects. If you must have wood then I would recommend the Flitzer line of biplanes.
    My avitar is the Flitzer F2 Tiger. www.flitzerbiplane.com

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    Registered User wiloows5050's Avatar
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    Re: WW1 wooden biplane

    Older wood aircraft without being built with a metal fuselage instead of wood, can be a nightmare of small parts. On the Thomas Morse I counted up to a 120 turnbuckles in the fuselage before I gave up counting. When I'm finally to start the fuselage I may take the easy route and build it out of welded 4130 and save the years of work. However, there is nothing like building the same way they did 100 years ago.
    FYI
    Robert's (Airdrome) newest plane (Sopwith Camel) is an aluminum frame wing with a welded steel fuselage. No telling how soon it will be available in a kit.

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    Registered User wiloows5050's Avatar
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    Re: WW1 wooden biplane

    I thought these might help.
    WW1 wooden biplane-dsc00602.jpg

    WW1 wooden biplane-dsc00600.jpg

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    Registered User djschwartz's Avatar
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    Re: WW1 wooden biplane

    Check out plans from Walt Redfern. Redfern Plans

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    Re: WW1 wooden biplane

    Wow, one picture is truly worth a thousand words. I was not expecting all the cabels. I was thinking more of a few bulkheads and some stringers.

    Jim

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    Registered User Mac790's Avatar
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    Re: WW1 wooden biplane

    Quote Originally Posted by Thrill Seeker View Post
    Yes I can weld and I have a Mig welder.
    I and probably most people here wouldn't recommend MIG for a fuselage welding, only TIG or gas welding.

    I was thinking more of a few bulkheads and some stringers
    Sounds more like a Fly Baby rather than a WWI warbird.

    Seb
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    "Time, training, training, training and more training is the key to any success."
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    Registered User PTAirco's Avatar
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    Re: WW1 wooden biplane

    Quote Originally Posted by Thrill Seeker View Post
    Wow, one picture is truly worth a thousand words. I was not expecting all the cabels. I was thinking more of a few bulkheads and some stringers.

    Jim
    I once counted all the turnbuckles in an original Sopwith Pup. I got tired after reaching 144. There may be more. The cost of aircraft turnbuckles these days is outrageous around $30-100 EACH, so this type of construction is simply impossible, financially speaking. Unless somebody has a way to mass produce quality turnbuckles.


    If you want a small, economical, professionally designed, tested and proven wood biplane - build a Flitzer. I have some first hand personal knowledge of this airplane and love the old, eccentric vintage appearance, but it flies very nicely without bad habits and even a low-time tailwheel pilot would have no difficulty. The VW engine makes it affordable. Metal fitting kits are available I believe.

    If I had time, I'd build one in a heart beat. Check out all the different variations you can build to change the appearance to suit yourself.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails WW1 wooden biplane-brianandersonz-21a-v4.jpg  
    "Aeronautical engineering is highly educated guessing, worked out to five decimal places. Fred Lindsley, Airspeed."

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    Registered User Kristoffon's Avatar
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    Re: WW1 wooden biplane

    Quote Originally Posted by PTAirco View Post
    The cost of aircraft turnbuckles these days is outrageous around $30-100 EACH, so this type of construction is simply impossible, financially speaking. Unless somebody has a way to mass produce quality turnbuckles.
    I suppose in quantity they can be built cheaply enough in a well equipped CNC shop. Stamp, drill, bend, repeat.

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    Registered User PTAirco's Avatar
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    Re: WW1 wooden biplane

    Quote Originally Posted by Kristoffon View Post
    I suppose in quantity they can be built cheaply enough in a well equipped CNC shop. Stamp, drill, bend, repeat.

    It's the rolled threads that get expensive and fork ends if you need them, but yes, CNC ought to make it feasible.
    "Aeronautical engineering is highly educated guessing, worked out to five decimal places. Fred Lindsley, Airspeed."

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    Registered User steveair2's Avatar
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    Re: WW1 wooden biplane

    I can't believe these are not more popular. I guess nads are almost extinct.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails WW1 wooden biplane-chipsz-21bfrontthree-quarter-sm.jpg  

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