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Thread: Google Search on HBA

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    Site Developer Jman's Avatar
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    Google Search on HBA

    One of the most frequent criticisms I've heard about HBA is how terrible the search feature is. Many users have resorted to going over to google to search HBA instead of using the default search function. Because of this, I've decided to bring google here to HBA for everyone to use. Google is the recognized leader in search engine technology and I believe having it here on HBA will help users find the data they are looking for faster and with more accurate results.

    How does it work? It works exactly like searching google.com except the search results are displayed here on HBA and the results are specific only to data stored here. Additionally, I've kept the "Advanced" search function below the Google search box so that, if you prefer, you can use the default forum search engine.

    There are two down sides to using Google as the default search engine:
    1. It takes time for threads to populate within the Google database. If you post a thread, it may not show up in the search results for as long as 24 hours. Most times it happens much faster.
    2. The search results page will have Google ads displayed off to the side of the search results. Google is a business and as such does not offer this service for free. You either allow their ads to be displayed or you pay a fee to remove them. I did some calculations and, with the amount of searching we do here on HBA, it would cost around $750 a year to remove the ads.... I'm researching how it might be possible to remove the ads for those members who help support HBA financially but, until then, we'll just have to live with the ads.


    Well, that about covers it. Please give it a try and tell me what you think. If you have any questions or comments, please post them in this thread or PM me.

    - Jake

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    Site Developer Jman's Avatar
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    Google Search on HBA

    Here are some tips and tricks for getting the most out of your Google searches. I took these from the Google Help site.

    ---------------------------------------------------

    Some basic facts

    • Every word matters. Generally, all the words you put in the query will be used.
    • Search is always case insensitive. A search for [ new york times ] is the same as a search for [ New York Times ].
    • Generally, punctuation is ignored, including @#$%^&*()=+[]\ and other special characters.
    • To make sure that your Google searches return the most relevant results, there are some exceptions to the rules above.


    Tips for better searches

    Keep it simple. If you're looking for a particular company, just enter its name, or as much of its name as you can recall. If you're looking for a particular concept, place, or product, start with its name. If you're looking for a pizza restaurant, just enter pizza and the name of your town or your zip code. Most queries do not require advanced operators or unusual syntax. Simple is good.

    Think how the page you are looking for will be written. A search engine is not a human, it is a program that matches the words you give to pages on the web. Use the words that are most likely to appear on the page. For example, instead of saying [ my head hurts ], say [ headache ], because that's the term a medical page will use. The query [ in what country are bats considered an omen of good luck? ] is very clear to a person, but the document that gives the answer may not have those words. Instead, use the query [ bats are considered good luck in ] or even just [ bats good luck ], because that is probably what the right page will say.

    Describe what you need with as few terms as possible. The goal of each word in a query is to focus it further. Since all words are used, each additional word limits the results. If you limit too much, you will miss a lot of useful information. The main advantage to starting with fewer keywords is that, if you don't get what you need, the results will likely give you a good indication of what additional words are needed to refine your results on the next search. For example, [ weather cancun ] is a simple way to find the weather and it is likely to give better results than the longer [ weather report for cancun mexico ].

    Choose descriptive words. The more unique the word is the more likely you are to get relevant results. Words that are not very descriptive, like 'document,' 'website,' 'company,' or 'info,' are usually not needed. Keep in mind, however, that even if the word has the correct meaning but it is not the one most people use, it may not match the pages you need. For example, [ celebrity ringtones ] is more descriptive and specific than [ celebrity sounds ].

    Advanced Search Tips

    The Basic search help article covers all the most common issues, but sometimes you need a little bit more power. This document will highlight the more advanced features of Google Web Search. Have in mind though that even very advanced searchers, such as the members of the search group at Google, use these features less than 5% of the time. Basic simple search is often enough. As always, we use square brackets [ ] to denote queries, so [ to be or not to be ] is an example of a query; [ to be ] or [ not to be ] are two examples of queries.

    Phrase search ("")
    By putting double quotes around a set of words, you are telling Google to consider the exact words in that exact order without any change. Google already uses the order and the fact that the words are together as a very strong signal and will stray from it only for a good reason, so quotes are usually unnecessary. By insisting on phrase search you might be missing good results accidentally. For example, a search for [ "Alexander Bell" ] (with quotes) will miss the pages that refer to Alexander G. Bell.

    Search within a specific website (site:)
    Google allows you to specify that your search results must come from a given website. For example, the query [ iraq site:nytimes.com ] will return pages about Iraq but only from nytimes.com. The simpler queries [ iraq nytimes.com ] or [ iraq New York Times ] will usually be just as good, though they might return results from other sites that mention the New York Times. You can also specify a whole class of sites, for example [ iraq site:.gov ] will return results only from a .gov domain and [ iraq site:.iq ] will return results only from Iraqi sites.

    Terms you want to exclude (-)
    Attaching a minus sign immediately before a word indicates that you do not want pages that contain this word to appear in your results. The minus sign should appear immediately before the word and should be preceded with a space. For example, in the query [ anti-virus software ], the minus sign is used as a hyphen and will not be interpreted as an exclusion symbol; whereas the query [ anti-virus -software ] will search for the words 'anti-virus' but exclude references to software. You can exclude as many words as you want by using the - sign in front of all of them, for example [ jaguar -cars -football -os ]. The - sign can be used to exclude more than just words. For example, place a hyphen before the 'site:' operator (without a space) to exclude a specific site from your search results.

    Fill in the blanks (*)
    The *, or wildcard, is a little-known feature that can be very powerful. If you include * within a query, it tells Google to try to treat the star as a placeholder for any unknown term(s) and then find the best matches. For example, the search [ Google * ] will give you results about many of Google's products (go to next page and next page -- we have many products). The query [ Obama voted * on the * bill ] will give you stories about different votes on different bills. Note that the * operator works only on whole words, not parts of words.

    Search exactly as is (+)
    Google employs synonyms automatically, so that it finds pages that mention, for example, childcare for the query [ child care ] (with a space), or California history for the query [ ca history ]. But sometimes Google helps out a little too much and gives you a synonym when you don't really want it. By attaching a + immediately before a word (remember, don't add a space after the +), you are telling Google to match that word precisely as you typed it. Putting double quotes around a single word will do the same thing.

    The OR operator
    Google's default behavior is to consider all the words in a search. If you want to specifically allow either one of several words, you can use the OR operator (note that you have to type 'OR' in ALL CAPS). For example, [ San Francisco Giants 2004 OR 2005 ] will give you results about either one of these years, whereas [ San Francisco Giants 2004 2005 ] (without the OR) will show pages that include both years on the same page. The symbol | can be substituted for OR. (The AND operator, by the way, is the default, so it is not needed.)

    Exceptions
    Search is rarely absolute. Search engines use a variety of techniques to imitate how people think and to approximate their behavior. As a result, most rules have exceptions. For example, the query [ for better or for worse ] will not be interpreted by Google as an OR query, but as a phrase that matches a (very popular) comic strip. Google will show calculator results for the query [ 34 * 87 ] rather than use the 'Fill in the blanks' operator. Both cases follow the obvious intent of the query. Here is a list of exceptions to some of the rules and guidelines that were mentioned in this and the Basic Search Help article:

    Exceptions to 'Every word matters'
    Words that are commonly used, like 'the,' 'a,' and 'for,' are usually ignored (these are called stop words). But there are even exceptions to this exception. The search [ the who ] likely refers to the band; the query [ who ] probably refers to the World Health Organization -- Google will not ignore the word 'the' in the first query. Synonyms might replace some words in your original query. (Adding + before a word disables synonyms.) A particular word might not appear on a page in your results if there is sufficient other evidence that the page is relevant. The evidence might come from language analysis that Google has done or many other sources. For example, the query [ overhead view of the bellagio pool ] will give you nice overhead pictures from pages that do not include the word 'overhead.'

    Punctuation that is not ignored
    Punctuation in popular terms that have particular meanings, like [ C++ ] or [ C# ] (both are names of programming languages), are not ignored. The dollar sign ($) is used to indicate prices. [ nikon 400 ] and [ nikon $400 ] will give different results. The hyphen - is sometimes used as a signal that the two words around it are very strongly connected. (Unless there is no space after the - and a space before it, in which case it is a negative sign.) The underscore symbol _ is not ignored when it connects two words, e.g. [ quick_sort ].

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    Site Developer Jman's Avatar
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    Re: Google Search on HBA

    Anyone notice an improvement? I personally think it's better after doing some side by side comparisons of the results from both systems. Much better search relevance. Anyone having any issues with it?

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    Registered User JamesAero's Avatar
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    Re: Google Search on HBA

    Much easier to use now. Thanks!!!

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    Re: Google Search on HBA

    Definitely a big plus, my compliments.

    For those that are a bit less familiar with searching techniques; fiddling around a bit with the options Jman described above can give you results that are a lot better as what you would normally get. "RV 8" will give much better results as RV 8 for example.
    Kennis vermenigvuldig je door het te delen.
    (You multiply knowledge by dividing it)

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    Registered User Hot Wings's Avatar
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    Re: Google Search on HBA

    Used the new search several times today. Found what I was looking for with little effort. Like it!
    Conventional wisdom and practices yield conventional results. If that is good enough for you:
    Problem solved.

    "--and pompous fools drive me up the wall. Ordinary fools are all right; you can talk to them, and try to help them out."
    Richard P. Feynman

    “Without deviation from the norm, progress is not possible.”
    Frank Zappa

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