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Thread: True ultralights?

  1. #106
    Registered User vtul's Avatar
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    Re: True ultralights?

    Quote Originally Posted by BBerson View Post
    Jack Harper's Home Depot ultralight is foam and wood from Home Depot. Plans built.
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=1Q-8TilAluQ
    I saw that one BBerson a couple weeks ago, but Jack Harper doesn't fly it. Still curious about it. I don't like the direct drive horiz 4 cycle engines. Same thing bit Roger Mann with a Kohler horiz DD 4 cy. on the Ragwing Heath. I don't know if Mr. Harper modified the engines, but I'd have concerns about crank and bearings. Doesn't mean the airframe isn't of interest differently powered. Anybody building this, or seen one fly?

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    Re: True ultralights?

    I guess your post implies it, but I imagine a vertical shaft engine that was meant to swing a heavy steel lawn mower blade might be converted to horizontal and handle a lawn mower blade just fine. I wonder if some of the horizontal shaft engines use the same bearings?

    Using two of these means that two 4 foot props at 3600 rpm are like one 5.6 foot prop at 2,556 rpm. Presumably, that means no redrive necessary. I'm also guessing that the little motors will stand up to correspondingly smaller props better than the big motors will. Whether that's good enough on a horizontal shaft motor, I don't know. Plus there are always the single engine issues to deal with unless it's a push me-pull you configuration.

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    Re: True ultralights?

    Quote Originally Posted by choppergirl View Post
    I don't really trust any airplane that costs more than $40 dollars... or weighs more than 40 pounds (Sweeney's Glider 33 lbs)

    Back from the caveman day's of aviation, when men were real hunka hunks, and didn't use pussy air compressor tools or bend brakes to build their mad, mad flying contraptions.

    From: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...E1&app=desktop
    Put you in the seat of a DC-6 and you'd be a convert before liftoff.

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    Re: True ultralights?

    The rigging sketch for the "V" Tail sniegolot is mind blowing.

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    Re: True ultralights?

    Man oh man this guy was prolific. never seen anything about him before. Is anything around in English? Especially but not limited to his propeller designing and carving? He has some of the nicest looking propellers!

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    Re: True ultralights?

    Quote Originally Posted by lr27 View Post
    I guess your post implies it, but I imagine a vertical shaft engine that was meant to swing a heavy steel lawn mower blade might be converted to horizontal and handle a lawn mower blade just fine. I wonder if some of the horizontal shaft engines use the same bearings?

    Using two of these means that two 4 foot props at 3600 rpm are like one 5.6 foot prop at 2,556 rpm. Presumably, that means no redrive necessary. I'm also guessing that the little motors will stand up to correspondingly smaller props better than the big motors will. Whether that's good enough on a horizontal shaft motor, I don't know. Plus there are always the single engine issues to deal with unless it's a push me-pull you configuration.
    I guess you'd have to find out by flying that setup and either being successful or having it come apart . Roger's face was badly burned -- it was sprayed with crankcaase oil when his Kohler industrial H-shaft let go after only a few hours on the meter. I can't say that the 2 engines used in the Home Depot plane are more or less likely to break up. It just doesn't appeal to me personally to do that experiment.

    Unfortunately, the designer didn't fly the plane at the show, and said he hadn't for awhile. If the designer and several others were flying around putting on hours, I'd be much more interested. But it seems to me very much an unproven design. Apologies if untrue, and very happy to be corrected......

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    Re: True ultralights?

    sniegolot?

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    Re: True ultralights?

    Quote Originally Posted by vtul View Post
    sniegolot?
    was attemting to respond to a different thread "flying on 14hp" but posted on this thread a couple times by mistake.

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    Re: True ultralights?

    You should check it out this guy was cool.

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    Re: True ultralights?

    The V-tail one you like the controls on is referred to on that site as the Altostratus. That might help find more info if you're searching.

    Personally I like the other one, the Cirrus. I wonder if something like that could find favour as a low powered US ultralight? I really like the Schwimmwagen that shows up in some of the pics too. I sure hope he didn't scavenge the Cirrus' VW engine from it.

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    Re: True ultralights?

    Quote Originally Posted by vtul View Post
    I guess you'd have to find out by flying that setup and either being successful or having it come apart . Roger's face was badly burned -- it was sprayed with crankcaase oil when his Kohler industrial H-shaft let go after only a few hours on the meter. I can't say that the 2 engines used in the Home Depot plane are more or less likely to break up. It just doesn't appeal to me personally to do that experiment.

    Unfortunately, the designer didn't fly the plane at the show, and said he hadn't for awhile. If the designer and several others were flying around putting on hours, I'd be much more interested. But it seems to me very much an unproven design. Apologies if untrue, and very happy to be corrected......
    Someplace on the web, I saw a video of someone test running an engine. They'd attached it to a bucket loader so that it could be moved around while running...

    If it's actually practical to convert vertical to horizontal, that might be more comfortable, but it's my guess there are horizontal engines someplace that use the same bearings as vertical. Anything like this should probably be tested on the ground for a while. Airboat? Prop powered kart?

    I wonder what, if any, single engine testing has been done with the Home Despot plane?

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    Re: True ultralights?

    Quote Originally Posted by lr27 View Post
    I wonder what, if any, single engine testing has been done with the Home Despot plane?
    Probably none. The Home Depot Plane is most likely a twin for cheap power, not for redundancy. I mean just look at the thing, it clearly was never made to safely cross oceans or mountains or the Congo or anything.

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    Re: True ultralights?

    Yes, that's true. However, with two engines, the chance of losing one of them is almost doubled. So it's a problem if it won't stay in the air on one. Also a problem if rudder can't keep it straight with one. And, of course, a bit more pilot skill is demanded. I think it could be a very big problem if one engine goes and:
    -there's no accurate airspeed measurement or
    -Vmc hasn't been determined or
    -the pilot doesn't know Vmc
    -the pilot is inexperienced and/or hasn't practiced engine out flying

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    Re: True ultralights?

    Quote Originally Posted by lr27 View Post
    Yes, that's true. However, with two engines, the chance of losing one of them is almost doubled. So it's a problem if it won't stay in the air on one. Also a problem if rudder can't keep it straight with one. And, of course, a bit more pilot skill is demanded. I think it could be a very big problem if one engine goes and:
    -there's no accurate airspeed measurement or
    -Vmc hasn't been determined or
    -the pilot doesn't know Vmc
    -the pilot is inexperienced and/or hasn't practiced engine out flying
    It's an ultralight. If you get an engine failure, you land, since you're never very far from the patch of dirt from which you took off. If single-engine yaw behavior appears to be a concern, you shut down the other engine and become a glider. Again, this isn't a "conventional" sportplane and isn't intended to be used like one. This is "get off the ground and buzz around the pasture" flying, and only that.
    "If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be. Now put the foundations under them." - Henry David Thoreau

    Design Project: Conceptual Design of an "Inexpensive" Single-Seat Motorglider
    Discussion Thread for the Project: Discussion: Conceptual Design of an "Inexpensive" Single-Seat Motorglider

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