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Thread: Relative safety of various construction materials

  1. #31
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    Re: Relative safety of various construction materials

    Additional safety issues:
    -wood: severed appendages, damage to lungs when not wearing !@#$%% dust mask while sanding
    -welded: burns,
    -sheet metal: cuts, severed or crushed appendages, probably other stuff (I actually met someone who lost most of a finger on the sharp edge of a B-29 bomb bay door he was carrying)
    -composites: allergies, other toxicity, lung damage Ever see what happens on a hot day if you don't spread out your epoxy in time?

    all: eye damage from flying fragments, ear damage if you get lazy about earplugs, chemical toxicity, asphyxiation if careless and spraying paint inside, fire and explosion from volatile liquids near pilot lights and sparks, making holes in yourself by doing dumb things with tools, getting your clothing caught in rotating machinery

    With flammables about, maybe we should all have wood or other static dissipative floors, slightly conductive shoes, big fire extinguishers, etc. They make floor wax that will help with this, also shoe straps, though maybe that's going too far.

    Probably lots of other things too. Obviously I don't know what the rates are, but my point is that safety while building is part of the picture as well. The issues involved depend somewhat on the material you pick, and a lot on how you approach your work.
    -----------------
    I'm not yet a full scale pilot, but, in the absence of extensive training, I suspect that simple, relatively slow aircraft are safer.

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    Re: Relative safety of various construction materials

    Just about any activity has associated hazards. The key to safety is to understand the hazards, understand how to mitigate / manage them, and fatithfully doing so. Flying isn't dangerous, but crashing is, and anything that can get you up into the air can also kill you. There is so much more to flying than just getting off the ground; I encourage you to get a pilot's license, and fly enough to discover the type of flying that you really want to do before focusing too much on a particular design. There are lots of posts here about this topic.


    BJC

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  4. #33
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    Re: Relative safety of various construction materials

    If crash survival is a top priority, then the safest building material might be whatever is attached to a BRS.

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    Re: Relative safety of various construction materials

    Quote Originally Posted by ToddK View Post
    If crash survival is a top priority, then the safest building material might be whatever is attached to a BRS.

    Not really. http://airfactsjournal.com/2012/05/d...cirrus-pilots/


    BJC

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    Re: Relative safety of various construction materials

    BJC is correct, go fly some stuff, visit shows, do some thinking etc. Fortunately there's a lot of great options.

    Hopefully you man up and go tube and fabric. Lol. Kidding, well, sort of. Haha.

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    Re: Relative safety of various construction materials

    Quote Originally Posted by BJC View Post
    I did not read anything in the linked article where a correctly deployed BRS failed to save lives.

    From Wikipedia:

    As of 15 August 2016, the CAPS has been activated 83 times, 69 of which saw successful parachute deployment. In those successful deployments, there were 142 survivors and 1 fatality. No fatalities, unsuccessful deployments, or anomalies (with the exception of one that is still under investigation) have occurred when the parachute was deployed within the certified speed and altitude parameters. Some additional deployments have been reported by accident, as caused by ground impact or post-impact fires, and 14 of the aircraft involved in CAPS deployments have been repaired and put back into service.[24]

    Post 2011, the year of their highest fatality rate to date, Cirrus has experienced an increase in CAPS deployments coinciding with a steady decrease in fatal accidents, giving them one of the best safety records in the industry and less than half the industry average. This was attributed to a new approach to training, particularly in when to deploy the parachute system

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    Re: Relative safety of various construction materials

    Cirrus has had to advertise to the owners "Pull early; Pull often" to get you to use it . Insurance does not want you flying a Cirrus in dead stick. They might not even pay off a claim if it could have been pulled. The problem with Cirrus has always been people being able to out buy their skill. It is an unforgiving airplane if mishandled by a C150 pilot; once upset it is a little more demanding than a Bonanza with the same number of seats. If you fly it like a baby airliner you will be fine. A friend has a Cirrus and he is cutting a hole in the side of his RV8 for a chute. He believes in it, although he wants to be the first on the block with one in a RV8. I hate watching him cut up a perfect airplane to do it. He should have built another with it integral.

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    Re: Relative safety of various construction materials

    Quote Originally Posted by ToddK View Post
    If crash survival is a top priority, then the safest building material might be whatever is attached to a BRS.
    Quote Originally Posted by ToddK View Post
    I did not read anything in the linked article where a correctly deployed BRS failed to save lives.

    From Wikipedia:

    As of 15 August 2016, the CAPS has been activated 83 times, 69 of which saw successful parachute deployment. In those successful deployments, there were 142 survivors and 1 fatality. No fatalities, unsuccessful deployments, or anomalies (with the exception of one that is still under investigation) have occurred when the parachute was deployed within the certified speed and altitude parameters. Some additional deployments have been reported by accident, as caused by ground impact or post-impact fires, and 14 of the aircraft involved in CAPS deployments have been repaired and put back into service.[24]

    Post 2011, the year of their highest fatality rate to date, Cirrus has experienced an increase in CAPS deployments coinciding with a steady decrease in fatal accidents, giving them one of the best safety records in the industry and less than half the industry average. This was attributed to a new approach to training, particularly in when to deploy the parachute system
    I mis-read your first post, above, as "If survival is a top priority ..." My comment was about fatality rates in an aircraft with a BRS, not how many people survive the use of the BRS.

    Pilot judgement and piloting skills, gained through quality training and continual practice, are the key factors is staying alive in an airworthy airplane. Relying on an "easy" button is not a good plan.


    BJC

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  12. #39
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    Re: Relative safety of various construction materials

    Again, all great input. I am not particularly "obsessed" with safety, but from my time as an NFO in the Navy, understand that it is a methodology and way of thinking. Part of that is to ask the right questions and consider the possibilities before they happen. A consistent and mindful pursuit of safety is the balance I am pursuing. Certainly a BRS is an option. Living in Vermont, much of the terrain is forested and mountainous (really, just hilly by Rocky Mountain and Cascade standards). Often, there are limited options for forced landing. A BRS might be a good option for some of the scenarios I can imagine. I have done some more thinking and research on my goals,engine selection and available airframes, but will start a new thread to get input on that front.

    Thanks,
    Ward

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    Re: Relative safety of various construction materials

    Part of safety is to take reasonable precautions and use appropriate protective equipment. I had safety glasses stop a red-hot fragment before my eyes, a helmet that kept a concussion from turning into a depressed skull fracture, and a seat belt that kept me from going through a windshield, and I am a careful person.

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    Re: Relative safety of various construction materials

    Quote Originally Posted by Swampyankee View Post
    Part of safety is to take reasonable precautions and use appropriate protective equipment. I had safety glasses stop a red-hot fragment before my eyes, a helmet that kept a concussion from turning into a depressed skull fracture, and a seat belt that kept me from going through a windshield, and I am a careful person.
    Amen to that! If it weren't for safety equipment, I would be dead, and crippled by now.

    Ward

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