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Thread: Aircraft VW reliability - What have we learned?

  1. #136
    Registered User Daleandee's Avatar
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    Re: Aircraft VW reliability - What have we learned?

    Quote Originally Posted by Pops View Post
    I had a slide carb and would never buy another, but I do like the Zenith carb. Very easy to adjust and works good, but you do have to have carb heat in one way or another.
    Agreed ... no more slide carbs for me. I use a Marvewl Schebler with carb heat and it is flawless in operation. I've heard good things about the Zenith carbs and wonder why more of the "frustrated with the slide carb" crowd don't make life easier on themselves and get a real carburetor. I believe that my airplane should run at least as good as the vehicle I drove to the airport:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S6GD5s7osHE

    Your mileage may vary ... but I doubt it!

    Dale Williams
    N319WF @ 6J2
    Myunn - "daughter of Cleanex"
    120 HP - 3.0 Corvair
    Tail Wheel - Center Stick
    Signature Finish 2200 Paint Job
    135.7 hours / Status - Flying

  2. #137
    Registered User gtae07's Avatar
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    Re: Aircraft VW reliability - What have we learned?

    Quote Originally Posted by Turd Ferguson View Post
    Are there any Ellison Throttle Body carbs still floating around? They were kinda pricey but I never heard of any issued with those.......
    Dad has an Ellison TBI on his Lycoming. Never had an issue with it. It's just like the carb on a .40 size RC two-cycle.
    I reserve the right to be smarter tomorrow than I was yesterday.

  3. #138
    Registered User cheapracer's Avatar
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    Re: Aircraft VW reliability - What have we learned?

    http://www.amnet.net.au/~munks/AEmenu.htm

    Very successful Australian VW aero company been around a long time.

    click on "features" in the left hand menu.
    Quote Originally Posted by BoKu View Post
    The vast majority of engineering failures are the results of failure of imagination rather than failure of calculation.

  4. #139
    Registered User Little Scrapper's Avatar
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    Re: Aircraft VW reliability - What have we learned?

    Quote Originally Posted by cheapracer View Post
    http://www.amnet.net.au/~munks/AEmenu.htm

    Very successful Australian VW aero company been around a long time.

    click on "features" in the left hand menu.
    The features link is actually pretty educational.

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  6. #140
    Registered User Mark Z's Avatar
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    Re: Aircraft VW reliability - What have we learned?

    Joe's Revflow is what my friend has on his GP powered Sonerai. He also built an RV-6 and put the ETB on it and it flys today with the same as it has for many trouble free years. I don't know enough to make an educated guess but was thinking to buy Joe's complete engine package for my CX-4. However, Dave Thatcher wouldn't settle for anything but the Zenith carb. Go figure?? Just from what I've seen it looks like apples and oranges to me but again I'm dumb as a box of rocks. Anyone wanna talk me into one or the other?

  7. #141
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    Re: Aircraft VW reliability - What have we learned?

    Without a starter, I don't want a carb without a fuel bowl. With no fuel bowl just one bubble in the fuel line can give you a dead engine and un-porting a fuel pickup in a fuel tank would not be a good thing to happen turning base to final. I always save the right fuel tank for the most fuel for the standard left hand pattern. I have forward and a rear fuel pickup in each wing tank. The forward fuel line comes down the front door post and the rear pickup down the rear door post then forward to a tee at the front door post, then a off/on valve. Same for both sides, both fuel lines go to a tee at the inside of the firewall behind the fuel strainer. All 3 Bearhawk designs uses the same fuel system.

    Got-A-Have a fuel bowl in the carb. VW's don't windmill.
    Dan
    Pops

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    Registered User Mark Z's Avatar
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    Re: Aircraft VW reliability - What have we learned?

    Understood.

  9. #143
    Registered User bmcj's Avatar
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    Re: Aircraft VW reliability - What have we learned?

    Quote Originally Posted by Little Scrapper View Post
    With a wife and 3 kinds...
    Three kinds of wives? How did you manage that? My wife says I'm only allowed one!

  10. #144
    Registered User bmcj's Avatar
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    Re: Aircraft VW reliability - What have we learned?

    Quote Originally Posted by BBerson View Post
    Run dead is Ok with NiCad.
    Unless it chooses to reverse polarity on one or more of the cells. I don't understand the mechanism that causes this, but I've had that happen.

  11. #145
    Registered User mcrae0104's Avatar
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    Re: Aircraft VW reliability - What have we learned?

    Quote Originally Posted by bmcj View Post
    My wife says I'm only allowed one!
    I think Scrap likes redundant systems. No single point of failure.
    ​simplify.

  12. #146
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    Re: Aircraft VW reliability - What have we learned?

    I use a lipo to power my GPS and my strobes along with my Traffic alert system. I have left this plugged in three times now. Each time leaving it installed for a few days. When I got to it it was totally dead. Three times I have recharged it and in fact I am still using it today.

    One must bring the cells back up very slowly. I use around .2 amps to do this. I also use a different setting then lipo to do this. I use the setting for Life batteries. Once all cells come up I am able to switch to lipo and balance the cells. It takes maybe ten cycles of charging and discharging to get all 4 cells equal again using a very low setting. Nothing above .5 amps. I also charge this lipo in the oven in a pan of sand with the oven off. If the lipo catches fire it's in the oven. If the weather is good outside I charge outside when charging a dead lipo. I hope to never do this again. But I am sure I will. Lucky it has never caught fire when discharging in my airplane, as my airplane sets in the hangar. That could happen. I have used it so much now if I do not have it with me as I am going home I miss it or notice I left it behind.

    Now it's on my after flight check list, remove lipo battery.

    If you happen to discharge your lipo you may want to try this before you throw said lipo in the trash.

    Tony

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    Registered User Little Scrapper's Avatar
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    Re: Aircraft VW reliability - What have we learned?

    Quote Originally Posted by bmcj View Post
    Three kinds of wives? How did you manage that? My wife says I'm only allowed one!
    It's the beard. Chicks dig beards.

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    Registered User Little Scrapper's Avatar
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    Re: Aircraft VW reliability - What have we learned?

    Quote Originally Posted by mcrae0104 View Post
    I think Scrap likes redundant systems. No single point of failure.
    Lol. That's good!

  16. #149
    Registered User BBerson's Avatar
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    Re: Aircraft VW reliability - What have we learned?

    Quote Originally Posted by N8053H View Post

    If you happen to discharge your lipo you may want to try this before you throw said lipo in the trash.

    Tony
    Should he do this for his electronic ignition battery?

  17. #150
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    Re: Aircraft VW reliability - What have we learned?

    I stopped by my local old time VW guru to pick up a few things for my Karmann Ghia and we got to talking about heat issues.
    Now keep in mind I didnt mention aircraft use but nonetheless I wanted to share what he had to say and see what others think.

    Please keep in mind most of what he does is original resto work followed by some mild street modifications simply to make older aircooled VW's keep pace with modern speeds.
    But he still had a lot to say in regards to heat in the heads and exhaust valve issues and most of it all stemmed around the factory VW heater boxes.At first I was a little unclear about their design since my car had them deleted prior to my owning it.But after he showed me one and explained how they worked it made a lot of sense.

    The exhaust tubes coming off of the head are actually finned heat sinks surrounded by a chamber that always has air being forced through it from the fan.Now I always assumed that if the heat was off that they were not used and apparently this is a common misconception.But the air is still used to cool the tubes and instead it's dumped underneath the car from the heater box when not in use.He said this is one of the more common issues and people tend to just assume that because they dont use the heat they can just block off the tubes leading to heat issues.

    Now I know this pertains mainly to cars but he was VERY adamant as to why the engineers did this and claimed that by modifying the original design you'd see a rise in cylinder head temps while cruising at a constant load on the highway for any amount of time.He believes that the engineers did a great job of designing everything to work together and as soon as "you start monkeying with it" you're going to get problems.

    Now as far as cars go I've got no reason to doubt him,especially since he is a retired engineer.But it makes me wonder if VW's engineers were counting on this part of the cooling system to account for dealing with cylinder head cooling.
    I did do a quick search and it is a pretty common issue.

    Now cooling the exhaust goes against what I know about high performance applications.But could VW have in fact been using this as a way to regulate temps?I'd have to dig to be sure,but I seem to recall that there was a crude coil like thermostat that helped regulate airflow in my original tins and that would have controlled flow through the heater boxes too and help regulate operating temps.

    Last is could a manifold/head pipe designed as a heat sink help draw the heat out of the heads?If its possible that might help explain why some of the heads have issues dealing with shedding heat at higher power levels.I mean the engineers really knew what they were up to and it's evident by how the system works as a whole,as soon as one thing is modified it tends to hurt more then help.

    He actually had a Bug there that was relatively stock except for exhaust(deleted heater boxes) that was also dealing with heat problems.He had quite a bit to say about it because they went as far as adding a Porsche fan to help cool it. Apparently the Porsche fan saps a lot of power due to parasitic drag,flows too much too fast and the whole mess cost him 2-3 times the power he might of gained by swapping the exhaust.........Although sort of accurate I did chalk some of this rant to his "Purist" point of view

    Anyway I just thought I'd throw it out there to see what you guys think.A lot of what he had to say in regards to the OEM cooling system made a lot of sense.

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