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Thread: 3D Printer build

  1. #91
    Registered User proppastie's Avatar
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    Re: 3D Printer build

    Still not sure if tapes pre coated or machine coated, precoated is pre-preg to me, but it is 40 yes. Since I worked on the Harrier.

  2. #92
    Registered User FritzW's Avatar
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    Re: 3D Printer build

    My first attempt at printing an "anatomically correct" 1/10 scale VP-1...

    I made the mistake of using a "Brim" which was a huge pain to try to get off the parts (1/10 scale 1/4" ply ribs are only .025" thick!) I'll try it again without it.

    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	57728 VP-1 stabilator. Next time, without the brim, the parts should be ready to glue together right out of the printer.
    Iēsous Christos, Theou Yios, Sōtēr

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  4. #93
    Registered User proppastie's Avatar
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    Re: 3D Printer build

    does an added designed support structure help or is it better on a flat piece of glass

  5. #94
    Registered User Jay Kempf's Avatar
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    Re: 3D Printer build

    Quote Originally Posted by proppastie View Post
    Still not sure if tapes pre coated or machine coated, precoated is pre-preg to me, but it is 40 yes. Since I worked on the Harrier.
    Prepreg is fabric that is made flat then is cut then applied. Prepreg used to almost always be "crimped" or "woven" fabrics. These are individual fiber bundles in tape form, very close rows of individual parallel fibers. They are being fed directly off of a spool sometimes with a paper backing interleaved sometimes not. Different animal. Not sure if anyone has done a prepreg placement machine but I doubt it. There are a lot of automated pre-preg methods and there are also knitting machines that wet or dry for custom fabrics that have any number of non-crimped layers knitted or tack glued together now. But you have to be Boeing or BMW to afford them normally.
    Jay K.

    VT USA

  6. #95
    Registered User FritzW's Avatar
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    Re: 3D Printer build

    Quote Originally Posted by proppastie View Post
    does an added designed support structure help or is it better on a flat piece of glass
    Slicer software will automatically add supports or you can add them manually.

    Even if you don't need supports, sometimes you need help keeping the part stuck to the table (rafts or brims).

    A "raft" is a solid(ish) base that your part prints on top of. If everything goes right the raft just peels off.

    With a "brim" your part prints on the glass but has a little, single layer, rim printed around it to help keep the part from peeling off the glass.

    My little parts are just about as thin as the single layer brim so there's not a really good "step" where you can break the brim off. ...but the parts are so thin they probably don't need one anyway.

    It's a learning process, ...and that's 90% of the fun
    Iēsous Christos, Theou Yios, Sōtēr

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    Registered User Victor Bravo's Avatar
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    Re: 3D Printer build

    Quote Originally Posted by FritzW View Post
    No problem. The only trick is holding down the .020 sheet while you cut the gussets.
    Program the machine to drill all the fastener holes on one pass, then come back and cut the outline of the parts, leaving TWO or even THREE 1/8" wide bridge connections between the gusset and the larger sheet of raw material. The bridge connectors keep the gusset from being moved around during the cutting process, and they keep the gusset from falling out of the sheet. Come back later with a small pair of dikes and clip out the part just before you need it. Ten seconds in front of a small sander and the part is ready for installation.

    Another interesting thing is that you could take the whole sheet after the cutting is done (with the attached gussets) and do an alodine dip process, or anodize, without winding up with a basket of un-identifiable gussets. The diagram printed out from the computer will identify each gusset until the moment you clip it out of the sheet.

    If you ran the sheet through a laser machine before or after the CNC cutting operation, the laser could bar code or numerically mark every gusset.
    "Everything in this book may be wrong."
    Richard Bach, Illusions


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    Registered User FritzW's Avatar
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    Re: 3D Printer build

    Quote Originally Posted by Victor Bravo View Post
    Program the machine to drill all the fastener holes on one pass, then come back and cut the outline of the parts, leaving TWO or even THREE 1/8" wide bridge connections between the gusset and the larger sheet of raw material. The bridge connectors keep the gusset from being moved around during the cutting process, and they keep the gusset from falling out of the sheet. Come back later with a small pair of dikes and clip out the part just before you need it.
    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	57768 Yep, that's pretty much the way CNC works
    Iēsous Christos, Theou Yios, Sōtēr

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