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Thread: Ideal CNC

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    Registered User rbrochey's Avatar
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    Re: Ideal CNC

    Quote Originally Posted by FritzW View Post
    If this gizmo works out it wouldn't matter how big your parts are




    FWIW my machine is 4x8 (52" x 104") but it'll cut any length in 8' increments. I'm limited to about 40' because the distance from the end of the table to the garage wall is about 20'.

    Or, how about a Carvewrite machine? (post #20 here) It'll cut any length but it's limited to 14" wide and, IIRC, ~6" on the Z.

    Attachment 56704
    Very cool

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    Registered User FritzW's Avatar
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    Re: Ideal CNC

    It'll probably take a version or two before they get all the bugs worked out but I'm going to have to get one.
    Iēsous Christos, Theou Yios, Sōtēr

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    Re: Ideal CNC

    Quote Originally Posted by Little Scrapper View Post
    I know. It's the new me. Ever since I gave up meat and became a vegan I'm like a totally different person.
    I always suspected you were a pinko.

    But good for you. Coming to OSH, so we can all congratulate you on your 1/1/17 - 1/30/17 Cassutt progress? (And 2/1/17 - 7/21/17?)
    ​simplify.

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    Re: Ideal CNC

    Um, a CNC what? I have a CNC mill with 12 x 50 inch travels, but I suppose you mean a CNC router. Or a waterjet? My guitar-building friends get CNC routers to fit the biggest sheet of material they can handle.

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    Registered User Atomic_Sheep's Avatar
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    Re: Ideal CNC

    Quote Originally Posted by TFF View Post
    Are you going to make a one piece mold, or are you going to make up the plans from small pieces? What are going to CNC? Wood, metals, plastic, composites? Are you going to have any hand finishing or will all parts have to come out of the CNC finished? Are you going to have specialized CNC machines for specific jobs like 7 axis mills or table 3 axis. Mills? Plasma? Waterjet? How much money can you devote to the machines?
    I don't think it would be possible to make a 1 peice mold for a fuselage unless you go really big, possible but a bit too big for what I'm hoping. I'm trying to make the smallest CNC machine that I can get away with for airplane construction but the largest one I can get for maximum versitility if that makes sense. Any mold can be made with smaller pieces. I'm thinking a CNC machine that would be able to make fuselage formers and wing ribs. But I could be overlooking something. In terms of materials, my research is pointing me in the direction of just woods, plastics and aluminium. Anything heavier than aluminium is staring to look unrelaistic.

    Budget wise, I don't want to spend more than 5000 for it. I've already got everything electronics wise, so it's just the machine that I'm working on.

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris In Marshfield View Post
    If it was me, and I was "kitting" a plane one day, I'd probably use a 4x12 (or larger) version of the Laguna Tools SmartShop CNC to turn rectangle-shaped aluminum sheet into airplaned-shape aluminum flat parts. It's mainly because I'm a sucker for a cool demo video and sales pitch.

    http://www.lagunatools.com/cnc/SmartShop
    I've seen Laguna machines, but if I had to make a guess, they would be out of my price range.

    Quote Originally Posted by ScaleBirdsScott View Post
    6x12x3 is probably the ideal work envelope for most anything without going to something wild like the cnc makes that build modular homes. You can trim that down as you see fit.

    Minimum would probably be 2x4 to be useful
    Ok thanks, will have a think about those dimensions.

    Quote Originally Posted by BJC View Post
    CNC is so passé; I'm holding out for a 40 foot X 30 foot 3-D printer that will print oriented carbon nano tubes.


    BJC
    Haha, yes that would be nice or something that could produce sheets of graphene although I think graphene is a bit too brittle for anything uselful plane wise.

    Quote Originally Posted by Little Scrapper View Post
    I'm down 42 pounds now, feel better than I ever had. My knee pain is 100% gone.

    I was on the edge of heart attack and elected to not let them work on me. With my diet my numbers are dropping so well.the doctors are literally blown away.

    Anyhow. Carry on.

    I always thought a 1' x 1' CNC would be cool. A customer of mine built a 4' x 8' CNC for his wood shop. It's truly amazing, but he spent 2 years building it in his spare time.
    If you want to lose weight, do cycling, it's on the top 5 list of best fat burning activities you can do. Diets are no fun.

    Quote Originally Posted by Turd Ferguson View Post
    Do you want a CNC that mills? One that turns? I don't think you can build a CNC that allows one to load a 30ft billet of aluminum and cut away everything that doesn't look like a plane.
    At the moment I'm thinking of just plain old 3 axis but with a large enough Z axis to allow me to add a 4th axis of sorts for turning but I don't think it would be possible to turn anything like steel with what I'm planning so turning isn't very high on my list. I think I'm aiming a few categories lower than what you're thinking.

    Quote Originally Posted by FritzW View Post
    If this gizmo works out it wouldn't matter how big your parts are




    FWIW my machine is 4x8 (52" x 104") but it'll cut any length in 8' increments. I'm limited to about 40' because the distance from the end of the table to the garage wall is about 20'.

    Or, how about a Carvewrite machine? (post #20 here) It'll cut any length but it's limited to 14" wide and, IIRC, ~6" on the Z.

    Attachment 56704
    That's an interesting idea. A bit slow however and there also always the the other option of using offsets to make a piece larger than the table work area - this last point somewhat makes my original question moot, but I would still like to make something as practical as possible.

    Quote Originally Posted by fredoyster View Post
    Um, a CNC what? I have a CNC mill with 12 x 50 inch travels, but I suppose you mean a CNC router. Or a waterjet? My guitar-building friends get CNC routers to fit the biggest sheet of material they can handle.
    Yes a CNC router.
    Last edited by Atomic_Sheep; December 6th, 2016 at 01:39 AM.

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    Re: Ideal CNC

    Quote Originally Posted by BJC View Post
    CNC is so passé; I'm holding out for a 40 foot X 30 foot 3-D printer that will print oriented carbon nano tubes.


    BJC
    Keep holding........

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    Registered User ToddK's Avatar
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    Re: Ideal CNC

    Quote Originally Posted by Little Scrapper View Post
    I'm down 42 pounds now, feel better than I ever had. My knee pain is 100% gone.

    I was on the edge of heart attack and elected to not let them work on me. With my diet my numbers are dropping so well.the doctors are literally blown away.

    Anyhow. Carry on.

    I always thought a 1' x 1' CNC would be cool. A customer of mine built a 4' x 8' CNC for his wood shop. It's truly amazing, but he spent 2 years building it in his spare time.
    I have been eyeballing a Shapeoko 3 for a while. It does wood, aluminum, and plastic. Pretty handy, fairly cheap, and comes in several sizes.

    Congratulations. Loosing weight is probably the hardest thing an average person will ever do. I took the exact opposite approach. Doing the keto diet. Lots of fat and super low carb. I have lost 30 lbs, no exercise, no hunger. Going to get BBQ for lunch. I do plan on having blood work done in another 15lbs. I will probably cut the fat a bit and stay low carb. I had no idea the harm that extra 30lbs was doing. I feel so much better without it.

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    Registered User Jay Kempf's Avatar
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    Re: Ideal CNC

    I built a machine based on 72" 1/2-10 rods. I sort of backwards engineered it around that so it ended up with a workspace of right around 60" x 60" x 14" but the target was 48 x 48 x 12. I built the bed open in Z so that you could slide a 4 x 8 sheet through. Most materials are not available in much bigger than 4 x 8 so that is really practically the limit of home shop work spaces. Smaller machines store better because most times you will be doing small parts anyway so it can have a home somewhere. It is also possible to build a machine vertical and only consume wall space but you have to deal with gravity of course with the workpiece which takes some planning. I also hung all the controls and computers off of the main chassis so the whole thing is portable around the shop. And the best part is that I only have about $750 in the whole rig. Now this thing isn't going to cut tool steel but it is perfect for cutting soft materials to sanding tolerances which is what we need.

    Here's the truth about large machines. You don't need one for a one off. You can cut mold blocks on a smaller machine and you can cut accurate fixture features on the edges. You can then assemble those smaller pieces together on a large table to get a large mold. If you do that well you will have minimal or no sanding to fix some inter mold block areas that might transfer to the finished part. You can do all the tooling separation and planning in the CAD machine so it really is no extra effort.
    Jay K.

    VT USA

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    Re: Ideal CNC

    My new mold making machine has a travel of 12.5'x6.5'x3'. All AC brushless servos, 1600 ipm rapids. That big enough

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    Registered User BBerson's Avatar
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    Re: Ideal CNC

    Any of the Mcdougall books is perfect for learning about reducing your empty weight by going vegan.

    https://www.drmcdougall.com/health/shopping/books/

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    Registered User Hot Wings's Avatar
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    Re: Ideal CNC

    Quote Originally Posted by harrisonaero View Post
    My new mold making machine has a travel of 12.5'x6.5'x3'. All AC brushless servos, 1600 ipm rapids. That big enough
    ENVY
    A little more Z would be nice.
    Conventional wisdom and practices yield conventional results. If that is good enough for you:
    Problem solved.

    "--and pompous fools drive me up the wall. Ordinary fools are all right; you can talk to them, and try to help them out."
    Richard P. Feynman

    “Without deviation from the norm, progress is not possible.”
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    Re: Ideal CNC

    My other router is a 4'x8'x6" travel and stepper driven (can lose steps if stalled) so I definitely wanted a little more room to grow plus wanted good Japanese servos that wouldn't lose their position. It was a lot of work to design and money to get built but it turned out nice and works well for my business.

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    Registered User cheapracer's Avatar
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    Re: Ideal CNC

    I think you should seriously consider what bed size you need to place a 1220 x 2440 standard sized aluminium sheet down.

    I work around that sheet size and it covers everything for me, your largest former with tabs to be folded should come in just under that width.
    Quote Originally Posted by BoKu View Post
    The vast majority of engineering failures are the results of failure of imagination rather than failure of calculation.

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    Registered User Hot Wings's Avatar
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    Re: Ideal CNC

    Quote Originally Posted by harrisonaero View Post
    It was a lot of work to design .
    So not store bought plug and play?

    I've got an old mill/lathe thing I'd like to convert and servos would be better for this than steppers. I'd be interested in the hardware you used for the servos and encoders. Are they discrete motors and encoders or steppers with an encoder hung on the back making a hybrid system.

    I'm not worried so much about loosing steps but eliminating error by putting the feedback sensors directly on the axis rather than on the drive screws.
    Conventional wisdom and practices yield conventional results. If that is good enough for you:
    Problem solved.

    "--and pompous fools drive me up the wall. Ordinary fools are all right; you can talk to them, and try to help them out."
    Richard P. Feynman

    “Without deviation from the norm, progress is not possible.”
    Frank Zappa

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    Registered User Atomic_Sheep's Avatar
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    Re: Ideal CNC

    Thanks guys, didn't think there were standard material sizes for aircraft construction - thought there was a very wide range of sizes available, will have to look into it some more. I guess the same rules apply no matter what you build.

    Quote Originally Posted by harrisonaero View Post
    My new mold making machine has a travel of 12.5'x6.5'x3'. All AC brushless servos, 1600 ipm rapids. That big enough
    That's feet if I'm not mistaken? That's a pretty massive machine if it is.
    Last edited by Atomic_Sheep; December 7th, 2016 at 11:29 PM.

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