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Thread: Work rules / practices

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    Re: Work rules / practices

    Airlines have what is called RII or slang R double I. Required Inspection Item. Essentially someone has to be happy with your work enough to co sign the job. When I do something, I do it as a mechanic. I stop in my head and become the inspector. I was a QA/QC inspector once upon a time so I was stuck signing my name to other peoples jobs. When I can, I try to get someone to go after me, even if not official. I also will not preflight someone else's airplane. I am a one man shop for the most part, and I am not the neat one. One minute I am doing a Annual and the next I have a flight line problem. I clean up for different phases of jobs, but most of what is used stays with the project till done. That is only possible with a one man shop. Add another, especially one you are having to go behind and that does not work. I do go to completion points like all engine mounts to completion, or one flight control to complete install. For the most part the divisions have to be in my head cant afford a 300'x200' hangar.

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    Re: Work rules / practices

    Finagle's Third Law:
    In any collection of data, the figure most obviously correct, beyond all need of checking, is the mistake.

    Corollaries:
    (1) Nobody whom you ask for help will see it.
    (2) The first person who stops by, whose advice you really don't want to hear, will see it immediately.

  3. #48
    Registered User Twodeaddogs's Avatar
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    Re: Work rules / practices

    Have a vacuum cleaner on hand and use it frequently, inside and outside the aircraft. The amount of times that I have come across tools, aluminium swarf (a particularly nasty way to cut your hand), drilled out rivet remains, drill bits, remains of split pins and so on, because builders are too lazy to clean up after their work. I stopped one final inspection before first flight of an RV because I was finding so much crap inside the hull and wings of the RV that I downed tools and walked away, because the builder was not taking the process seriously. He got quite annoyed until I produced the tools I'd found inside the wing and he got out the hoover and got to work.....there was another builder that, on another Final Inspection, was annoying the assembled persons so much with his micromanagement/fussiness that we led him outside and made him go for a walk to calm down and my friends and I got the RV finished and ready for first flight and only then did we allow him back in.

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    Registered User choppergirl's Avatar
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    Re: Work rules / practices

    I was thinking the other day of color coding my wrenches and sockets with nail polish stripes, but I'd need 25 different colors, and it would be too expensive at $4 a bottle to pimp out my nail polish collection with some truly strange rainbow colors. If I doubled up I could maybe get away with 6 two color combinations but sorting them would be no longer as visually clear cut...

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    Registered User Hot Wings's Avatar
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    Re: Work rules / practices

    Quote Originally Posted by choppergirl View Post
    , but I'd need 25 different colors,
    2 colors are about all you need. White = 1/4" Blue = 3/8" White = 1/2" Blue = 5/8" and so on. If you can't tell a 3/8" from a 5/8" at a glance, or a 5/16" from a 7/16" (both unmarked) you probably need a different hobby.

    Use red/green for metric and yellow/black for Whitworth. Colored electricians tape and heat shrink work well too for some tools.
    Conventional wisdom and practices yield conventional results. If that is good enough for you:
    Problem solved.

    "--and pompous fools drive me up the wall. Ordinary fools are all right; you can talk to them, and try to help them out."
    Richard P. Feynman

    “Without deviation from the norm, progress is not possible.”
    Frank Zappa

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    Registered User Twodeaddogs's Avatar
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    Re: Work rules / practices

    go to your nearest surplus and get some ammunition cans. They are sturdy, waterproof, stackable, can be painted,etc etc and make great toolboxes. Thery can also be made into stoves and stereos, if you ever need them ;-)

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    Registered User narfi's Avatar
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    Re: Work rules / practices

    Hmm.... I've only seen color on tools used as a "personal brand" not to differentiate between sizes. I've always thought the manufactures did good enough job at that.

    Yellow stripe = bobs
    Two red stripes = Frank's
    Etc....

    Then when you are cleaning you know who's box to pile them on....

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    Registered User Hot Wings's Avatar
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    Re: Work rules / practices

    Quote Originally Posted by narfi View Post
    I've always thought the manufactures did good enough job at that.
    It's all about speed. When you have a handful of tools free range in the shop or field you can tell which one is the right one at arms length. Some of the manufacturers stamps are kind of hard to see with a bit of dust on them.
    Conventional wisdom and practices yield conventional results. If that is good enough for you:
    Problem solved.

    "--and pompous fools drive me up the wall. Ordinary fools are all right; you can talk to them, and try to help them out."
    Richard P. Feynman

    “Without deviation from the norm, progress is not possible.”
    Frank Zappa

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    Re: Work rules / practices

    with regard to losing tools that were nearby a second ago, any tank veterans here will appreciate the concept of the "Turret monster", which will invariably take and lose anything you put down, in an allegedly safe space. this of course has the direct equivalent in homebuilding, when the spanner you were using disappears magically and reappears at overhaul, inside the aircraft. Just like stuff lost in the bowels of a tank.

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    Registered User BJC's Avatar
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    Re: Work rules / practices

    Quote Originally Posted by Twodeaddogs View Post
    with regard to losing tools that were nearby a second ago, any tank veterans here will appreciate the concept of the "Turret monster", which will invariably take and lose anything you put down, in an allegedly safe space. this of course has the direct equivalent in homebuilding, when the spanner you were using disappears magically and reappears at overhaul, inside the aircraft. Just like stuff lost in the bowels of a tank.
    Back in the day, finding and removing foreign objects in the fuselage of aerobatic airplanes was a significant part of the tech inspection at sanctioned aerobatic contests. I assueme that it still is.


    BJC

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    Re: Work rules / practices

    I inspect Classics and homebuilts and it is rare that I don't find something, even if it only the odd biro cap or a drilled out rivet shank, but I have have found tools inside wings, charts down the tail (especially in Cubs, for some reason), tools behind rudder pedals and so on. Best tool for an inspector is a good torch...

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    Re: Work rules / practices

    Quote Originally Posted by autoreply View Post
    As long as any extra hour spent on thinking how to design/make/calculate a part reduces build time by an hour; keep thinking if you're good at it.

    I do this at work all the time... I spent a day or two, half an hour each, just mentally going through the ... process, made a list, came up with some ideas, planned it etc... simply thinking how to avoid one mold can save you a few full work-days...
    Yes, yes… I don’t think I’m naturally a very organized person, but the “planning the next move” is imposed on me (I get up for work shortly after 3:00AM and usually don’t get home before about 7:15PM so my evenings are short) as I seldom more than 5-10 minutes in the shop except for weekends, so I spend much of my free time during the week planning my next move so the time I spend in the shop is as operationally, efficient as possible. As it comes to me I’ll stray into the shop through the week for a minute or two and lay out parts or materials (or make sure I actually have them while there is time to order if I don’t).

    From my sailing days, there is an old adage from small-boat travelers; “a place for everything and everything in its place…” That certainly helps in the shop… I do use peg-boards but find them minimally useful for everyday tools which I keep in specific drawers, holders in tool-boxes or my rolling work-bench (a notion I filched from other builders). Peg boards I use for expendables and infrequently used tools and measuring devices that otherwise fall to the bottom of containers/boxes/shelves… but each shop probably works best if it supports the method of the owner – key is having a method, and like many here seem to admit – when I violate my method is when I can’t find the tool I just laid down, or the bag of cotter-keys I just at shipped in, paying the overnight rate…

    For those of us who aren’t professional machinists, mechanics and the like – the shop is pleasant territory, albeit foreign territory… orderliness is fundamental, and then have the discipline to not violate it…

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    Re: Work rules / practices

    Quote Originally Posted by BJC View Post
    Back in the day, finding and removing foreign objects in the fuselage of aerobatic airplanes was a significant part of the tech inspection at sanctioned aerobatic contests. I assueme that it still is.


    BJC
    Wilbur and I went out and did a few loops and rolls in our Acrosport 2...when we landed here at the strip I looked back and noticed the elevator was sitting a little low but not on the stop like it was sposed to. So I pulled on it and it locked solid. Hmmm. Pulled the fairing off and there was the E6B I had been looking for several months; hung solid in the elevator actuator arm. Wilbur started shaking and talking to himself.
    When some of your stuff is missin don't forget to look in the tail of your plane.

    RIP Wilbur
    Last edited by Rockiedog2; April 8th, 2016 at 07:39 AM.

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    Registered User Little Scrapper's Avatar
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    Re: Work rules / practices

    When I was a plumbing foreman running massive 30-40 man crews plumbing high rises and hospitals I issued every plumber a giant Rubbermaid cart they wheeled from station to station. If the cart wasn't cleaned at the end of the day and parts and tools weren't put back you were given 3 strikes and your fired. I never let anyone go because of this, they loved it. People at the union would beg to be on my jobs because they were stress free. A big part of being efficient and stress free is organizaction. Organization requires discipline.

    Now that I own my own business I do the same with my truck. A lot of money is lost when you're disorganized.

    I do the same thing when I work on airplanes. Tool boxes hold all my tools and my mobile Rubbermaid cart holds my tools for current tasks only. And it can and will be messy, but when I'm done it's cleaned, no exceptions. I think builders who are organized get more done in a shorter span of time and the experience is more fun as well.

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    Re: Work rules / practices

    A lot of airlines have adopted mobile toolboxes like that, as it prevents people from having to keep going to the toolstores to draw stuff. This has several effects; it stops people goofing off on the excuse that they have to go to Stores to get item x, it reduces waste of consumables, reduces the need to go for more consumables and it reduces the need for cranky storemen....can't hurt to have it in the workshop at home,either.

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